copperplate engraving


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copperplate engraving

[′käp·ər‚plāt in′grāv·iŋ]
(graphic arts)
A thin, rigid plate of copper, with the lines of a picture cut, or engraved, into it, used for printing purposes; it is inked over, the ink is removed so that it is retained only in the engraved lines, and the plate is placed in a handpress where ink is transferred from engraved lines to overlying paper.
References in periodicals archive ?
While other girls roughened their fingers embroidering linens for their trousseaux, Diana turned engraving needles to the preparation of several impressive copperplate engravings to bring to Rome with her.
They employ the hatching and cross-hatching techniques found in old copperplate engravings or the wood-block chiaroscuro prints typical of sixteenth-century graphics.
Prince Stanislas Klossowski de Rola (whose father is the painter Balthus) tells us during the 17th century "an unprecedented quantity of alchemical works were printed, a significant number of which contained copperplate engravings.
When in his essay "A Photograph" Ekelof mentions the four French copperplate engravings of the Achilles legend which hung over the living-room sofa in his childhood home and singles out one where Achilles is dressed as a girl in an attempt to escape going to the Trojan War, Lagercrantz takes this as yet another "proof' of Ekelof's fundamentally feminine temperament (presumably he was also a latent cross-dresser).