coprophagy


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coprophagy

[kə′präf·ə·jē]
(zoology)
Feeding on dung or excrement.
References in periodicals archive ?
fornicata were not examined for assimilable organic matter, but given the rate of occurrence and the size of fecal pellets, it would appear that coprophagy is a minor contributor to caloric consumption.
However, the changes in husbandry, including reduction of coprophagy and limiting access to wood, which may have led to mechanical irritation of the oropharyngeal mucosa, was also believed to be an important part of therapy.
Coprophagy plays an important part in the digestive/nutritional process.
In order to obtain the maximum nutriment from its food the rabbit has developed the habit of coprophagy, passing certain of its intestinal contents through the system twice.
Stress can overstrain the endocrine (ductless) glands of which the adrenals are important members, and this in turn can cause digestive upset and the slowing down or even stopping of coprophagy.
It has been suggested that wire mesh floors inhibit the process of coprophagy by the loss of the soft pellets through the floor.
This should make one think seriously about uncontrolled ad lib feeding, under which scheme there is no "last meal" and as a result the process of coprophagy may be inhibited.
The rabbit is a single-stomach animal, but it has a form of pseudorumination, through coprophagy, or the consuming of some of its own feces.
Food was removed 8h prior to the blood glucose measurements, and the cage bedding was changed to minimize the interference from coprophagy.
Adult Sprague Dawley rats of either sex, weighing 180-200 g were housed in raised bottom mesh cages to prevent coprophagy and were kept in environmentally controlled rooms (25 [+ or -] 2 [degrees]C, 12 hours light and dark cycle).
Before the experimental outset, the animals were fasted for 24 h and kept in raised, mesh bottomed cages to prevent coprophagy.