coquette

(redirected from coquettes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

coquette

any hummingbird of the genus Lophornis, esp the crested Brazilian species L. magnifica
References in classic literature ?
Ichabod, on the contrary, had to win his way to the heart of a country coquette, beset with a labyrinth of whims and caprices, which were forever presenting new difficulties and impediments; and he had to encounter a host of fearful adversaries of real flesh and blood, the numerous rustic admirers, who beset every portal to her heart, keeping a watchful and angry eye upon each other, but ready to fly out in the common cause against any new competitor.
Coquette as you think me, I have never walked about in public with a gentleman before.
She is a vain coquette, and her tricks have not answered.
But this young girl was not a coquette in that sense; she was very unsophisticated; she was only a pretty American flirt.
Those sweet gray eyes of hers had been fixed very steadily upon me all through this outburst; as I finished they filled with tears, and my poor love sat wringing her slender fingers, and upbraiding herself as though she were the most heartless coquette in the country.
She has no conversation," he said, "and I am afraid that she is a coquette, for she is always flirting with the wind.
Herself a consummate coquette, she could not have maneuvered better on meeting a man she wished to attract.
There should be a little filigree about a woman--something of the coquette.
I have heard ladies call her coquette, not understanding that she shone softly upon all who entered the lists because, with the rarest intuition, she foresaw that they must go away broken men and already sympathised with their dear wounds.
She thought she had a good deal of the coquette in her, and I 've no doubt that with time and training she would have become a very dangerous little person, but now she was far too transparent and straightforward by nature even to tell a white lie cleverly.
I have rather played the coquette, but--it is delightful that the first nonsense with which one fools a man sufficed.
Come, don't call me a dear girl,' said Miss Price--smiling a little though, for she was pretty, and a coquette too in her small way, and Nicholas was good-looking, and she supposed him the property of somebody else, which were all reasons why she should be gratified to think she had made an impression on him,--'or Fanny will be saying it's my fault.