Coral Tree

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Related to coral trees: erythrina, common coral tree

Coral Tree

 

(Erythrina corallodendron), a low, deciduous, prickly tree of the family Leguminosae. The leaves are ternate. The flowers measure up to 5 cm long and are papilionaceous, with a long slender standard. These reddish pink flowers are in racemes. The fruits are moniliform pods with bright red seeds that resemble coral. The coral tree grows in tropical America. It is cultivated in warm countries as an ornamental; it is also used as a rapidly growing shade tree in coffee and cacao plantations. The bark is used for medicinal purposes in Brazil. In the USSR the coral tree is cultivated on the Black Sea Shore of the Caucasus and in the Southern Crimea. The name is also applied to other species of the genus Erythrina.

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Black grouper, mutton snapper and large numbers of yellowtail snapper are attracted to the staghorn coral trees at Mote's nursery near Looe Key, Bartels said.
To See Coral Tree Cafe Brentwood's Detailed Green Label and all their environmental steps, please visit:
We are Proud of Coral Tree Cafe's accomplishment to be the Greenest Certified Green Restaurant[R] in all of Brentwood and Encinco," said Michael Oshman, CEO and Founder of the Green Restaurant Association.
Coral Tree Cafe is best known for its healthy & sustainable Californian cuisine, organic coffee & teas, and corporate catering services.
If you have not pruned your South African coral tree (Erythrina caffra) during the past year, now is the time.
The coral trees planted down the median of San Vicente Boulevard in Santa Monica and Los Angeles are a good example.
In the late '40s, after the Red Car tracks were removed, horticulturist Samuel Ayres and nurserymen Dave Barry and Hugh Evans persuaded the city to plant Kaffirboom coral trees (Erythrina caffra).
I have seen many fallen or split-apart coral trees over the years, despite their having been pruned on an annual basis.
If you look at the more mature coral trees on San Vicente Boulevard, you will notice that many of the trunks show scars where large branches have broken off.
Q: We live in Porter Ranch, and up until six months ago had a spectacularly large coral tree in our front yard.
A: Like the coral tree (Erythrina caffra), Ficus Roxburghii (also known as Ficus auriculata) is a semi-tropical tree that would be at risk in the colder parts of the Valley.
This kind of symbiosis, incidentally, is also found in leguminous or pod-forming plants - including peas and beans, wisteria vines, acacia, mesquite and coral trees.