cordage


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cordage

(kôr`dĭj), collective name for rope and other flexible lines. It is used for such purposes as wrapping, hauling, lifting, and power transmission. Early man used strips of hide, animal hair, and plant materials. Hemp and flax were formerly standard in Europe and America but were largely replaced in the 19th cent. by hard fibers, especially Manila hemp and sisal. In the 20th cent. the natural fibers were replaced in many applications by synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester. The fibers are straightened, usually by combing, then spun into yarn. Twine, which is sometimes called cord, is formed by wrapping two or more yarns together. By twisting together a number of yarns, a strand is formed. By twisting together three or more strands, a rope is produced. A cable-laid rope is formed from three or more ropes. In general a synthetic fiber rope lasts much longer and is much stronger than a natural fiber rope. Steel wire, often with a fiber core, is also used for rope.

cordage

[′kȯrd·ij]
(engineering)
Number of cords of lumber per given area.
(materials)
Ropes or cords, especially those in the rigging of a ship.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pre Qualification: Cordage nylon braided 250 kg olive drab shade no.
Because of its high tensile strength and natural length, abaca became the widely used cordage fiber by navies since then.
Some of the most common species that are useful for making cordage include:
The Plymouth Cordage Company was among the first Niagara employers to team up with the CFL.
Indian Hemp (Apocynum cannibinum) was usually preferred for cordage over other vegetable fiber, among people near the Rocky Mountains and westward, whenever animal tissue was unsuitable.
Many an area settler and ranch cowboy rode saddle cinches woven from balls of twine or small mohair cordage.
market, offering competitive products such as flexible packaging, cordage, tableware, items for table or kitchen and more.
The Industrial market report offers a comprehensive guide to the size and shape of the Cordage, Rope, Twine and Netting market at a national level.
Yale Cordage has addressed this problem with its Cat's Eye reflective rope, which is enhanced with luminous reflective strands and has bright yellow pigmented coating.
Include as much cordage as practical and the wire can be used as a snare.
We will look at the data provided by two rope companies, New England Ropes and Yale Cordage, and show how to calculate shock loads on each.