corkscrew

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corkscrew

1. a device for drawing corks from bottles, typically consisting of a pointed metal spiral attached to a handle or screw mechanism
2. Boxing slang a blow that ends with a twist of the fist, esp one intended to cut the opponent

corkscrew

i. The action or performance of an airplane following a flight path resembling a corkscrew, as in a spiral or a tailspin. Specifically, an evasive maneuver performed in an airplane in which the plane is made to turn sharply right and left, alternately.
ii. A defensive maneuver executed effectively and widely by bombers during World War II. On sighting the enemy fighter, the bomber was made to immediately dive sharply and turn to either the port or star-board. In this process, it lost height and gained speed. The bomber was then pulled up into a climb, reversing its direction of turn once the aircraft had regained half the lost altitude, so that by the time the original altitude and course had been regained the bomber's speed had fallen by about half the amount it had gained in the dive. This resulted in the enemy fighter overshooting its target, especially if it tried to match the bomber's turn. The maneuver was repeated, if required. It was akin to a modern-day yo-yo.
References in periodicals archive ?
By the late 1880s the popularity of the French dance halls such as the Moulin Rouge and the risque cancan saw the emergence of the Germanmade folding 'Gay Nineties' picnic corkscrews in the shape of a lady's stockinged legs.
A mile down the Daemonelix Trail, Paleocastor's corkscrew burrows are still embedded in the side of ancient rock hillsides, just where James Cook found them in 1891.
One of the earliest and most sought after corkscrews, the Thomason patent of 1802, uses a similar double action but has one handle and an exotically named hermaphrodite screw.
Though most wine lovers just can't bring themselves to use the wing-type corkscrew, it does have its fans since it is so basic.
Without this level of social reintegration, the individual's chances of climbing the corkscrew are very slim.
Problems normally occur with corkscrews that have coils with a blade edge running along the length, almost like a screw.
He says the corkscrews most likely to be found in attic trawls are the direct pull variety.
Boulton's factory was already well established and had been exporting corkscrews among a myriad of other things for 30 years.
Margaret Thompson, Derby AWHAT you have sounds like a German novelty corkscrew by Steinfeld and Reimer.
Corkscrews are, in fact, highly collectable items and can sell for a lot of money.
Make your first glasses of 2006 taste even better with some fantastic wine accessories from corkscrews to coolers for perfect plonk.
NEW YORK-In the multifaceted and robust home barware market, corkscrews and other bar tools once again boasted the highest sales increase in 2004, growing an estimated 20 percent over the year before.