corkscrew

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corkscrew

1. a device for drawing corks from bottles, typically consisting of a pointed metal spiral attached to a handle or screw mechanism
2. Boxing slang a blow that ends with a twist of the fist, esp one intended to cut the opponent

corkscrew

i. The action or performance of an airplane following a flight path resembling a corkscrew, as in a spiral or a tailspin. Specifically, an evasive maneuver performed in an airplane in which the plane is made to turn sharply right and left, alternately.
ii. A defensive maneuver executed effectively and widely by bombers during World War II. On sighting the enemy fighter, the bomber was made to immediately dive sharply and turn to either the port or star-board. In this process, it lost height and gained speed. The bomber was then pulled up into a climb, reversing its direction of turn once the aircraft had regained half the lost altitude, so that by the time the original altitude and course had been regained the bomber's speed had fallen by about half the amount it had gained in the dive. This resulted in the enemy fighter overshooting its target, especially if it tried to match the bomber's turn. The maneuver was repeated, if required. It was akin to a modern-day yo-yo.
References in classic literature ?
Daisy tripped about the vaulted chambers, rustled her skirts in the corkscrew staircases, flirted back with a pretty little cry and a shudder from the edge of the oubliettes, and turned a singularly well-shaped ear to everything that Winterbourne told her about the place.
The streets generally are four or five to eight feet wide and as crooked as a corkscrew.
And the poor lady, so small in her black satin, shrivelled up and sallow, with her funny corkscrew curls, took the little boy on her lap and put her arms around him and wept as though her heart would break.
Smee had pleasant names for everything, and his cutlass was Johnny Corkscrew, because he wiggled it in the wound.
Very well," said the corkscrew, sadly; "I see I haven't any pull at this court.
form of the rude corkscrew of the period, and when it stood alone
She is sorry to find he is discontented, which is sinful and horrid, and hopes Mr Squeers will flog him into a happier state of mind; with which view, she has also stopped his halfpenny a week pocket-money, and given a double-bladed knife with a corkscrew in it to the Missionaries, which she had bought on purpose for him.
Sparkling and tingling after so long a nap, they pushed at their corks to help the corkscrew (like prisoners helping rioters to force their gates), and danced out gaily.
The drivers on these roads, who certainly get over the ground in a manner which is quite miraculous, so twist and turn the team about in forcing a passage, corkscrew fashion, through the bogs and swamps, that it was quite a common circumstance on looking out of the window, to see the coachman with the ends of a pair of reins in his hands, apparently driving nothing, or playing at horses, and the leaders staring at one unexpectedly from the back of the coach, as if they had some idea of getting up behind.
Crackit (for he it was) had no very great quantity of hair, either upon his head or face; but what he had, was of a reddish dye, and tortured into long corkscrew curls, through which he occasionally thrust some very dirty fingers, ornamented with large common rings.
Satisfied that it had not been tampered with, he slowly took from his breastpocket a rusty clasp- knife, and, with a corkscrew in the handle, opened the wine.
It's also worth looking out for corkscrews with bone or ivory handles and those fitted with a brush, intended for cleaning off the neck of bottles before uncorking.