cornice


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cornice

(kôr`nĭs), molded or decorated projection that forms the crowning feature at the top of a building wall or other architectural element; specifically, the uppermost of the three principal members of the classic entablatureentablature
, the entire unit of horizontal members above the columns or pilasters in classical architecture—Greek, Roman or Renaissance. The height of the entablature in relation to the column supporting it varies with the three orders, Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian, but
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, hence by extension any similar crowning and projecting element in the decorative arts. The term is also employed for any projection on a wall that is provided to throw rainwater off the face of the building. The cornice undoubtedly had its origin in the primitive eave projection: the Greek Doric and lonic cornices recall early wooden roof forms, and the Egyptian cavetto-and-fillet cornice is a derivation of the overhanging papyrus stalks that formed the eaves of primitive shelters. The cornice early lost its structural significance and became a stylized decorative element; in the Greek and Roman eras it assumed firmly standardized forms in the classical orders that were retained, with variations, through the Renaissance and later periods. As an element in the classical entablature the cornice is composed of the cymatium, or crown molding, above the corona, the projecting flat member, which casts the principal shadow; in this shadow, and supporting the corona, are a group of moldings called the bed molds, which may be elaborated with dentils. The Corinthian and Composite cornices are further embellished with modillions, or brackets, under the corona; the soffit of the Doric corona is decorated with square, flat projections called mutules, having guttae, or small knobs, hanging from their lower surfaces.

Cornice

The uppermost division of an entablature; a projecting shelf along the top of a wall supported by a series of brackets; the exterior trim at the meeting of a roof and wall, consisting of soffit, fascia and crown molding.

boxed cornice

A hollow cornice, built up of boards and moldings, resulting in a soffit under the eaves.

bracketed cornice

A deep cornice having large, widely spaced ornamental brackets supporting an overhanging eave; it is common in the Italianate style.

horizontal cornice

The level cornice of the pediment under the two inclined cornices.

modillion cornice

A cornice supported by a series of modillions, often found in Composite and Corinthian orders.

open cornice

Overhanging eaves where the rafters are exposed at the eaves and can be seen from below.

raking cornice

A cornice following the slope of a gable, pediment, or roof.

cornice

[′kȯr·nəs]
(architecture)
The crowning, overhanging part of an architectural structure.

cornice

cornice
1. Any molded projection which crowns or finishes the part to which it is affixed.
2. The third or uppermost division of an entablature, resting on the frieze.
3. An ornamental molding, usually of wood or plaster, running round the walls of a room just below the ceiling; a crown molding; the molding forming the top member of a door or window frame.
4. The exterior trim of a structure at the meeting of the roof and wall; usually consists of bed molding, soffit, fascia, and crown molding. For special types, see architrave cornice, boxed cornice, bracketed cornice, cavetto cornice, closed cornice, eaves cornice, modillion cornice, open cornice.

cornice

1. Architect
a. the top projecting mouldings of an entablature
b. a continuous horizontal projecting course or moulding at the top of a wall, building, etc.
2. an overhanging ledge of snow formed by the wind on the edge of a mountain ridge, cliff, or corrie
References in periodicals archive ?
A new copper cornice system was designed to relieve weight off the original masonry walls, with structural steel tubes transferring support of the cornice and raingutters to the roof trusses.
At the back is a second reception room with double glazed French doors leading to the back garden, shaped cornice, picture rail and feature fireplace surround with gas fire.
Creative Design Reveal Coping and Cornice Coping are designed to provide a unique look for your roof.
The group was doing the so-called Couloir Tour on Vihren's north wall, when a snow cornice collapsed, swiping them at least 40 down the rocky face.
To the rear of the complex, in The Parade, this cornice is continued with a further seven animals, including a kangaroo, lion, monkey and a bear.
To the other side of the hall there is a comfortable sitting room with attractive marble fireplace and more attractive cornice work.
A range of fifty stock designs of cornices are available, from simple cove patterns to the prestigious Adam Collection - which will add a stylish finishing touch to any room.
Cornice said its Dragon series drives offer 8GB and 10GB of storage space and are 40% smaller than the Storage Elements drives previously introduced.
Worse, no one knew what the complete cornice had originally looked like.
Using off-the-shelf trim from the home center and a compound miter saw, anyone with simple carpentry skills can create a beautiful window or door cornice in just a few hours.
Bill Bartlett installs a lot of exterior trim to reproduce the look of old trim in the communities in which he works, but processing yellow pine or Douglas fir boards into fine pieces of trim and cornice work takes a lot of sanding to reduce the appearance of heavy grains.
Doric column: a channeled column without a base, having as a capital a circular echinus supporting a square abacus, above which comes a plain architrave, a frieze of triglyphs and metopes, and a cornice the corona of which has mutules on its soffit.