coronal mass ejections


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

coronal mass ejections

(CMEs) See coronal transients.
References in periodicals archive ?
Coronal mass ejections are explosive events in which billions of tonnes of solar plasma are thrown into space.
An RAS spokesman said: "When heading toward the Earth, these coronal mass ejections can cause significant damage to the earth's space environment, satellites, even knock out the electricity grid.
Massive bursts of energy, such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections, also occur more frequently when the solar cycle peaks.
The display was expected to begin as the flares, known as coronal mass ejections, began to slam into the Earth's magnetic field late last night.
The US National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (Noaa) said that three coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were en route as the result of solar flares on the 13, 14 and 15 February (GMT).
The mission observed the sun in 3-D for the first time, the spacecraft revealed the sun's structure of coronal mass ejections which are violent eruptions of matter that can disrupt communications, navigation, satellites and power grids on Earth.
SXI will observe solar flares, coronal mass ejections, coronal holes and active regions in the X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum.
During the sunspot maximum, the solar magnetic field is disrupted by solar flares (extremely large explosions) emitting solar ultraviolet light, x-rays, energetic particles (million-electron-volt protons), coronal mass ejections (high temperature plasma gases which give a ring-like appearance around the sun or any other celestial body), and a "stormy" solar wind.
Papers are grouped in sections on instrumentation, convection and sunspots, magnetism of quiet sun and active regions, waves and shocks, chromospheric heating, coronal heating, local helioseismology, emerging flux, reconnection, flares, coronal mass ejections, and solar wind.
It has observatories orbiting the sun to monitor its violent outbursts - Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) - and the space weather it creates which could have a disastrous impact on Earth, satellites and astronauts.