pulp

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pulp:

see paperpaper,
thin, flat sheet or tissue made usually from plant fiber but also from rags and other fibrous materials. It is used principally for printing and writing on but has many other applications. The term also includes various types of paperboard, such as cardboard and wallboard.
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Pulp

 

a mixture of a finely ground (smaller than 1–0.5 mm) useful mineral and water. It is formed during such processes as the grinding of useful minerals before concentration, hydraulic mining, and hydraulic transport.

The density of pulp (the weight ratio between solid and liquid phases) and the number of particle-size fractions present determine the viscosity, which increases with an increase in density and in the number of particle-size fractions (in micron dimensions). The two factors also determine the sedimentation rate, which decreases with an increase in pulp density and with an increase in the fine particles present.


Pulp

 

the principal mass of the spleen. A distinction is made between red pulp, which consists of reticular tissue whose loops contain mostly red blood cells, and white pulp, which consists of reticular tissue with lymphoid cells.

pulp

[pəlp]
(anatomy)
A mass of soft spongy tissue in the interior of an organ.
(botany)
The soft succulent portion of a fruit.
(engineering)
(materials)
The cellulosic material produced by reducing wood mechanically or chemically and used in making paper and cellulose products. Also known as wood pulp.

pulp

1. soft or fleshy plant tissue, such as the succulent part of a fleshy fruit
2. Dentistry the soft innermost part of a tooth, containing nerves and blood vessels
References in periodicals archive ?
The coronal pulp cavity index: A biomarker for age determination in human adults.
The pulp chamber was opened with a sterile high speed diamond bur and the coronal pulp tissue was removed by a sharp spoon excavator and the chamber was then irrigated with sterile saline solution.
The teeth of patients in Group F were treated by coronal pulp amputation followed by a five minute application of a 20% Buckley's formocresol solution while the teeth of patients in Group C were treated by coronal pulp amputation hemostasis followed by placement of calcium hydroxide powder containing 99% calcium hydroxide (Sigma-Aldrich Chemical Company Ltd Poole Dorset UK) to the radicular pulp stumps.
Coronal pulps were removed and processed for indirect immunofluorescence using antibodies raised against TRPV1 and either the general neuronal marker, protein gene-product 9.
After removal of the coronal pulp two canals were localized (one buccal and one palatal) periapical radiograph was taken to determine the working length (figure 1).
It implies removing infected and inflamed coronal pulp tissue at the level of the entrance of the root canals and has been used in exposed carious or traumatized teeth with incomplete root formation.