corporal

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corporal

1
1. a noncommissioned officer junior to a sergeant in the army, air force, or marines
2. (in the Royal Navy) a petty officer who assists the master-at-arms

corporal

2, corporale
a white linen cloth on which the bread and wine are placed during the Eucharist

Corporal

 

military rank of noncommissioned officers in various foreign armies (the US, Great Britain, France, Italy, and others). In the Russian Army, the rank of corporal is referred to as early as 1647; it was officially introduced by the Military Regulations of Peter I. In the first half of the 19th century it was replaced by the military rank of noncommissioned officer.

References in periodicals archive ?
48) In the same year, black students constituted seventeen percent of the student population and were corporally punished at over two times the rate of white students.
Furthermore, just as the Office had chastised the village elder for alleged violence against Dar'ia Vakhrameeva earlier in the year, now it brought special attention to the alleged violence against Pelageia's sister in law: "you, having yourself corporally punished the sister in law .
comfort with using state mechanisms to corporally punish people who
For example, how should a school counselor work with a student who is corporally punished by her family because the family believes she is devil possessed?
To me, the most important aspect of this whole experience was this: that no matter what the fifteen of us, professors from around the country and from diverse disciplines, were doing, whether we were corporally experiencing the disorientation of not knowing, gleefully finding out for ourselves plunged up to the elbows in Everglades water, or deliberately analyzing our own self-awareness as learners, all of us, at every stage, were passionately thinking about how we could carry this pedagogy back into our own classrooms, how we could energize our students as much as we were being energized.
1,900 public school students are corporally punished.
In its first manifestations, honor was a concept or ideal that was reserved for those of noble birth or something that was passed on only through blood or wealth, but as time went on it came to mean something dealing with a person's soul or spirit; therefore by dishonoring someone, a person had corporally harmed another even if the insult was not physical.