corporatism


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corporatism

  1. as in Spain under Franco and more generally in association with FASCISM, the state control of major ‘corporations’ (e.g. labour organizations), with the aim of removing or suppressing social conflict, fostering nationalism, etc.
  2. relations between government and key interest groups (see PRESSURE GROUPS), especially big business and TRADE UNIONS, involving:
  1. intermediation – bodies standing between the state and the individual citizen negotiate agreements with the government on behalf of their members (e.g. agreements on wages and prices);
  2. incorporation – the possession of a special status by these organizations (e.g. in the UK the CBI or the TUC), so that, in some respects, they become virtual extensions of government, what Middlemas, Politics in an Industrial Society, (1979) calls ‘governing institutions’. The UK is often regarded as having moved in a corporatist direction in this second sense in the period 1960 to 1979, a tendency which was reversed with the election of the Thatcher government in 1979. Modern Austria is some times advanced as a more fully developed example of corporatism in sense 2 , characterized by features lacking in the UK, including wide social agreement on the value of social partnership, compulsory membership of trade unions and employers organizations, and effective cooperation between capital and labour.
In a more general sense, ‘intermediate organizations’, and thus ‘corporatist’ social structures, were advanced as a solution to modern social ills by DURKHEIM. Corporatism is often regarded as one of the ways in which governments intervene to manage ADVANCED CAPITALISM. However, in the UK and elsewhere corporatism has been undermined by crises of accumulation and a reversal of consensus politics.

See FISCAL CRISIS IN THE CAPITALIST STATE, HABERMAS; see also SECTORAL CLEAVAGES.

References in periodicals archive ?
In the early 20th century, corporatism was entrenched in Fascist Italy, Nazi Germany, and to a lesser extent in Portugal and Ireland.
This assumption, expressed repeatedly throughout the book, is at odds with the presented facts of resilient corporatism accompanied by a significant weakening of organized labour since German unification.
Corporatism inside the boardroom is the feeling that the people best able to run the political economy are the rich and powerful.
If social control is no longer a viable organizing model, then why does corporatism carry on?
I define corporatism as state-industry collusion against free enterprise.
The latter would never end the conflict in the given geopolitical context and more than any other power Indian imperialism and corporatism should have the bulk of the concern.
In the United Kingdom, corporatism got a bad name in the 1970s, when tripartite negotiations were blamed for giving unions excessive power and for inflation, although they did manage to contain externally-generated inflation at a lower cost in lost production and unemployment than the policies that followed after 1979.
What the backers of McCain-Feingold and critics of Citizens United see as a bug, libertarian populists believe is a design feature of big government and corporatism.
com and interested parties, be they vendors who wish to slip the bonds of corporatism or people who would rather buy from somebody than from something, can learn more at http://www.
The left-spinning media apparently does not want to advertise what capitalism has accomplished in spite of the fact that free-market capitalism has been severely crippled over the years by government cronyism, mercantilism, corporatism, socialism, dependency, debt, and regulatory overkill.
At the risk of going too far, I have a hard time not thinking of the classic Mussolini quote: "Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the merger of state and corporate power.
Fascism should more appropriately be called corporatism because it is a merger of state and corporate power" - Benito Mussolini.