corporatism

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corporatism

  1. as in Spain under Franco and more generally in association with FASCISM, the state control of major ‘corporations’ (e.g. labour organizations), with the aim of removing or suppressing social conflict, fostering nationalism, etc.
  2. relations between government and key interest groups (see PRESSURE GROUPS), especially big business and TRADE UNIONS, involving:
  1. intermediation – bodies standing between the state and the individual citizen negotiate agreements with the government on behalf of their members (e.g. agreements on wages and prices);
  2. incorporation – the possession of a special status by these organizations (e.g. in the UK the CBI or the TUC), so that, in some respects, they become virtual extensions of government, what Middlemas, Politics in an Industrial Society, (1979) calls ‘governing institutions’. The UK is often regarded as having moved in a corporatist direction in this second sense in the period 1960 to 1979, a tendency which was reversed with the election of the Thatcher government in 1979. Modern Austria is some times advanced as a more fully developed example of corporatism in sense 2 , characterized by features lacking in the UK, including wide social agreement on the value of social partnership, compulsory membership of trade unions and employers organizations, and effective cooperation between capital and labour.
In a more general sense, ‘intermediate organizations’, and thus ‘corporatist’ social structures, were advanced as a solution to modern social ills by DURKHEIM. Corporatism is often regarded as one of the ways in which governments intervene to manage ADVANCED CAPITALISM. However, in the UK and elsewhere corporatism has been undermined by crises of accumulation and a reversal of consensus politics.

See FISCAL CRISIS IN THE CAPITALIST STATE, HABERMAS; see also SECTORAL CLEAVAGES.

References in periodicals archive ?
The same conception, replacing the society of individuals and political parties with one of corporations and bodies, and liberal with corporatist representation, is seen in the totalitarian (fascist or communist) regimes that succeeded or almost succeeded in eliminating their enemies.
Although Roh (2014) and Choi (2014) implicitly hinted at the problem of regulatory capture in the Sewol tragedy, no studies have so far rigorously discussed the problem of regulatory capture or the long-lasting influences of state corporatist arrangements.
As long as they can buy legislators, Congress, the courts and the presidency, the progress we do or don't make in the fight over these social issues can be a good distraction from the power corporatists wield, income inequality, and their abilities to amass vast fortunes of sizes unheard of in all of human history.
The budget surpluses, which are in some cases phenomenal, and the comparatively moderate level of government indebtedness with low real interest rates are the basic macro components that empower the governments in the region to perpetuate corporatist welfarism.
Let's hope that the billionaires' wealth wasn't acquired through the machinations of the corporatist state
Furthermore, as to the development of indigenous innovation, Phelps concludes that the relatively corporatist economies performed less robustly because they lacked the economic institutions and culture to "enable, stimulate, and spur experimenting, exploring and trying things.
Other analyses on this subject have shown convincingly that unification allowed German employers to create a two-tier wage system that enabled them to roll back unit labour costs despite the resilience of corporatist arrangements.
In the United States, this corporatism began to grow in the postwar years and manifested itself by firms losing control to outside government oversight, labor unions, and community stakeholders--unlike the socialists, the corporatists found that they could exert control without exercising outright ownership.
The corporatist Republicans let the libertarians and conservatives have the paper platforms," but then they "throw out a welcome mat for Big Business lobbyists with their slush funds who are anything but libertarian or conservative in their demands.
The corporatist model of state systems focuses on how interest representation is organized by the state into representational monopolies within functionally differential categories in exchange for observing certain control of leadership and demands by the state.
3) Salamon and Sokolowski (2001) use a fourfold classification of state/society interrelations by distinguishing corporatist and statist governments, but I found it difficult to separate these two types of states.
The corporatist model makes no sense to younger generations who grew up using the Internet, the world's freest market for goods and ideas.