corporatism

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corporatism

  1. as in Spain under Franco and more generally in association with FASCISM, the state control of major ‘corporations’ (e.g. labour organizations), with the aim of removing or suppressing social conflict, fostering nationalism, etc.
  2. relations between government and key interest groups (see PRESSURE GROUPS), especially big business and TRADE UNIONS, involving:
  1. intermediation – bodies standing between the state and the individual citizen negotiate agreements with the government on behalf of their members (e.g. agreements on wages and prices);
  2. incorporation – the possession of a special status by these organizations (e.g. in the UK the CBI or the TUC), so that, in some respects, they become virtual extensions of government, what Middlemas, Politics in an Industrial Society, (1979) calls ‘governing institutions’. The UK is often regarded as having moved in a corporatist direction in this second sense in the period 1960 to 1979, a tendency which was reversed with the election of the Thatcher government in 1979. Modern Austria is some times advanced as a more fully developed example of corporatism in sense 2 , characterized by features lacking in the UK, including wide social agreement on the value of social partnership, compulsory membership of trade unions and employers organizations, and effective cooperation between capital and labour.
In a more general sense, ‘intermediate organizations’, and thus ‘corporatist’ social structures, were advanced as a solution to modern social ills by DURKHEIM. Corporatism is often regarded as one of the ways in which governments intervene to manage ADVANCED CAPITALISM. However, in the UK and elsewhere corporatism has been undermined by crises of accumulation and a reversal of consensus politics.

See FISCAL CRISIS IN THE CAPITALIST STATE, HABERMAS; see also SECTORAL CLEAVAGES.

References in periodicals archive ?
As long as they can buy legislators, Congress, the courts and the presidency, the progress we do or don't make in the fight over these social issues can be a good distraction from the power corporatists wield, income inequality, and their abilities to amass vast fortunes of sizes unheard of in all of human history.
His focus on the philosophic underpinnings of the modern economy, even though he believes it is now restrained by corporatist ideology, is a clarion call to leaders of less-dynamic Western economies.
The corporatist model makes no sense to younger generations who grew up using the Internet, the world's freest market for goods and ideas.
Deal corporatists as, alternatively, advocates of a vision of a
The NIRA was supported by an unstable alliance: the corporatists and the progressives.
technical councils), as Gregor underscores, were never minimally realized, much to the dismay of Bottai and Ugo Spirito, who both conceded that the new corporatist order was effectively stillborn.
A majoritarian faction of corporatist Republicans and Democrats have aggressively combined to usher through many of corporate America's top legislative priorities.
The corporatist form involves policy-making linkage between the state (provincial government) and economic producer groups.
Ironically, it was often the advocates of a more strictly pluralist conception of political economy, rather than corporatists, who called on the state to play a more interventionist role in industrial relations.
America's major parties support a far more economically intrusive government than any that Dollfuss, Mussolini, or other non-Nazi right-wing corporatists tried to put into operation between the world wars.
The rent-a-mob demonstrators and their antics make the one-world corporatists appear conservative, reasonable, and responsible by comparison.
The corporatists argue that we have to leave things to the CEOs of AT&T and Scott Paper, that we cannot possibly have ordinary people - through their elected officials - get involved in the process.