corporeal

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corporeal

of the nature of the physical body; not spiritual
References in periodicals archive ?
I contemplate how the document can affect the corporeality of its subject: how these pieces of paper could lead to someone being institutionalised or imprisoned; how these pieces of paper could set them free.
These "drunken, disorderly passions" enter White's language through his transgressive and scatological impulse--that "vein of vulgarity" pulsing strongly throughout his work--and through his consistent association of representation and corporeality.
Toward that end, we can further say this: no matter how we imagine our worlds, whether as a hierarchically ordered cosmos with prefixed and stable boundaries, or as a self-organizing universe both wild and far flung in its spatio-temporal immensity, the eschatological vision inspired by Christ's resurrection is one that affirms our shared corporeality as the very site of salvation, a salvation that is at once inmost to its cosmic-historical unfolding, and yet is given by That which transcends the field of its immanence.
Corporeality becomes problematic with the pilgrim's ascent to the transitive space of Purgatory, from whence a progression to the pure and immaterial realm of Heaven is implied.
Thus there is a focus on the politics of identity, community, individuality and corporeality.
In Dickinson, about whom Cameron has written two seminal books, corporeality functions as the materiality of writing inscribed--precisely because the spiritual has become material--"indelibly on consciousness.
In this section of the book, visuality thus emerges as a vehicle or mediating environment in which issues of class, race, and corporeality are negotiated.
Niklaus Largier develops a model of flagellation as an ecstatic corporeality based in renuciation and mimesis by slowly and methodically basing flagellation in medieval religious practice.
Both feature youngsters sitting astride horses that both have a muscular corporeality about them, yet have been left unfinished.
D'Elia contrasts Aretino's spurned literary rendering, from the I Quattro Libri de la humanita di Christo (1535) to Titian's celebrated versions, in Aretino's mimetic Annunciation the simulated representation of the opening of the heavens transforms the essentially spiritual subject into theatrical corporeality.
A ghost does not have flesh and bones, as you see that I have", even eating food in their presence to prove the corporeality of his resurrected body (cf.
Scholars debate the significance of medieval Sheela-na-gigs, according to Arias, who also examines Susan Connolly and Carmel Benson's contemporary paintings of Sheela-na-gigs, which "encourage contemporary women to stop perceiving their own corporeality as a heavy, awkward and shameful burden of guilt" (116).