corporeal

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corporeal

of the nature of the physical body; not spiritual
References in periodicals archive ?
Her artwork focuses on the relationship between imagination and corporeality, which is caused by experience.
In Gadda's case, the modernist interest in the embodied dimension of human experience edges on post-modern territory, with its lack of a unified knowledge and a liquefied, fluid corporeality.
There is much to praise and very little to fault in Bruce Dean Willis's Corporeality in Early Twentieth-Century Latin American Literature.
Underlining the division between two schools of feminism about the body, however, Janet Price and Margrit Shildrick claim that "other feminist writers have developed theory that is explicitly embodied and insistent on the centrality of the material body; while yet others, influenced by poststructuralism and postmodernism in particular, have put into question the giveness and security of the so-called natural body, positing instead a textual corporeality that is fluid in its investments and meanings" (1).
To conclude this exercise in source criticism, five papers, gathered here under the general heading "The Culture of Reclining: Corporeality, Sexuality, Intimacy," were first presented in 2009.
Her bold disciplinary move, thus, is to take affect away from spectatorship studies, and position it "as a matter of aesthetics, form, and structure, [which] undeniably removes corporeality, experience, physicality, viscerality, and skin shudderings from discussion" (40).
Items reviewed in this issue include: Stories About Stories: Fantasy and the Remaking of Myth by Brian Attebury; The Body in Tolkien's Legendarium: Essays on Middle-earth Corporeality, edited by Christopher Vaccaro; Critical Essays on Lord Dunsany, edited by S.
In this article I develop a perspective on the interconnectedness of education and corporeality that allows to analyze concrete school practices in a way that has not been explored so far.
Juxtaposed with personal narratives are reflections on shared labor and servitude located in the marked bodies of diasporic queer and female Filipina/o subjects--a connection that simultaneously demonstrates respect and allegiance but also redeploys the fetishization and commodification of Filipina corporeality within geopolitical capitalist liberalism and in both US and Philippine nation-building projects.
At various points, the book reads as if the authors have inserted the words "body" or "corporeality" into the text for the sake of cohesion among the chapters, though the corporeality of the body does not in fact surface.
The examination of the tattoo and its intertextual reference offers provocative interpretations of the corporeality of a woman's body as text-bearer.
Beyond a mere revisiting of bodies as a core feature of theatre, contemporary discourses of corporeality as a site of negotiation between nature and culture, materiality, discourses and power (see Judith Butler, Susan Bordo and others), as well as the performative turn in theatre studies are significant recent trends of reviewing the extent to which body matters on stage.