corrective therapy

corrective therapy

[kə′rek·tiv ′ther·ə·pē]
(medicine)
A program, and the techniques, designed to improve or maintain the health of a patient by improving neuromuscular activities and personal health habits and promoting relaxation by adjustment to stresses.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Scoliosis Correction Center treatment offers a non-surgical alternative scoliosis treatment and corrective therapy for all degrees of spinal curvature.
Most assessment techniques are generic; they are relevant to all corrective therapy because they provide important information about the patient's condition, as well as the response to treatment.
As a prelude to corrective therapy for reproductive complications (and health disorders in general), I draw blood for an endocrine-immune test I developed.
Irrespective of race, colour or creed this dross of humanity must receive corrective therapy that cures its disease.
First, he gets his backside off to Cynthia Payne's house for corrective therapy - Miss Whiplash may be retired but I can think of no- one more qualified for the task.
In 1955 the American Corrective Therapy Association (ACTA) approved the first formal definition of the profession, then known as "Corrective Therapy.
Ollie has been a revelation since sorting out his embarrassing driving and is knocking his tee shots longer and straighter thanks to some corrective therapy from Tiger Woods' coach Butch Harmon.
Commenting on the important milestone, Ellipse Technologies Chairman Michael Henson said, "Ellipse hopes to revolutionize the treatment of scoliosis and offer corrective therapy to a broader population in need, consisting of both young and older scoliosis patients.
Commenting on the European regulatory approval, Ellipse Chairman, Michael Henson said, "Ellipse hopes to revolutionize the treatment of scoliosis and offer corrective therapy to a broader population in need, consisting of both young and older scoliosis patients.
In addition to the promise of providing corrective therapy for genetic diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa, nucleic acid nanoparticles may also offer the potential to provide effective treatments for more complex disorders such as diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, and various diseases that injure ganglion cells and the optic nerve.
In addition to corrective therapy for genetic diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa, nucleic acid nanoparticles may provide effective treatments for more complex disorders such as diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, and various diseases that injure ganglion cells and the optic nerve.