corridor

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corridor

1. a hallway or passage connecting parts of a building
2. a strip of land or airspace along the route of a road or river
3. a strip of land or airspace that affords access, either from a landlocked country to the sea (such as the Polish corridor, 1919-39, which divided Germany) or from a state to an exclave (such as the Berlin corridor, 1945--90, which passed through the former East Germany)
4. a passageway connecting the compartments of a railway coach
5. corridors of power the higher echelons of government, the Civil Service, etc., considered as the location of power and influence
6. a flight path that affords safe access for intruding aircraft

Corridor

A narrow passageway or gallery connecting several rooms or apartments within a residence, school, hospital, office building or other structure.

What does it mean when you dream about a corridor?

Symbol of transition; going from one situation to something different. Alternatively, a corridor can represent a route to one’s unconscious mind. In psychoanalysis, a womb symbol. (See also Hallway).

corridor

[′kär·ə·dər]
(ecology)
A land bridge that allows free migration of fauna in both directions.

corridor

1. A long interior passageway providing access to several rooms.
2. A public means of access from several rooms or spaces to an exit.
3. An enclosed passageway that limits the means of egress to a single path of travel. Also see exit, passageway.

corridor

corridor
i. A ‘hole' with defined boundaries, through the terminal control area designated Class B Airspace, in which aircraft may operate without an ATC (air traffic control) clearance or communication with air traffic control.
ii. A safe path variably for either a low-level penetration that is relatively free of obstructions or a path in which enemy radar cover is least or is relatively safe from enemy defenses. Also, a path through which certain types of traffic are permitted.
iii. A restricted air route specified for use by friendly aircraft and established for the purpose of preventing friendly aircraft from being fired on by friendly forces.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because this election must not and will not be decided in the corridors of power.
Call it thrash, call it metal, call it hard rock - Motorhead's music is not the sort that one would expect to be played in the corridors of power.
While Blatter does not have any direct say in the decision, his voice in the corridors of power is certainly influential
The world of politics is seedy and sleazy enough without the fake and shallow worlds of TV, Hollywood and pop music acting up in the corridors of power.
A group of East Cleveland politics students are jetting off for the US capital to get a close-up look at the American corridors of power.
Alistair Campbell's departure from the corridors of power will fill many other newspaper columns apart from mine, but I'm fairly sure that you can't uninvent the wheel and whoever takes Alistair's place will doubtless be as dogged and as loyal to the Boss as he was.
FRENCH pupils got a first-hand account of life in Coventry's corridors of power when they met new lord mayor Cllr Sucha Bains.
That's certainly the case for Home Secretary David Blunkett, whose beloved guide dog Lucy retired this weekend after almost a decade walking the corridors of power.
The Football League are desperate to regain some credibility after the ITV Digital fiasco, but Barney's snub will be seen as another blow inside the corridors of power.
Yesterday the MSP for north-east Scotland told how a romance that blossomed in the corridors of power in Edinburgh was sealed with a kiss on a mountain in the French Alps.
After 28 years of prowling the corridors of power, Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alatorre ended his political career Wednesday with a lengthy tribute.
uk @kevin_maguire KEVIN MAGUIRE Stalking the corridors of power