corrosion cell

corrosion cell

[kə′rō·zhən ‚sel]
(metallurgy)
A condition on a metal surface in which a flow of electric current occurs between the metal surface and an electrolyte with which it is in contact sufficient to cause the metal to degrade.
References in periodicals archive ?
We created a corrosion cell using a potentiostat, three electrodes, and a solution to mimic the metals environment at the corrosion laboratory at Georgia Tech.
A corrosion cell comprising four concrete beams was constructed.
The partially heat-activated WOA residues (moisture-absorbing) were, by themselves, not corrosive; however, combined with high chloride residues from a HASL flux (marginal cleaning during board fabrication) the moisture absorbed by the flux was enough to establish the conditions for a corrosion cell.
All four components are required for a corrosion cell to exist.
ANODE--Half of an electrolytic corrosion cell in metal from which metal dissolves, often leaving pits.
We wanted to avoid the possibility of a galvanic corrosion cell between the cast iron casing and the stainless steel impeller and sleeves," he says.
The admixture provides corrosion protection to anodic and cathodic areas of corrosion cell sites.
The water (an electrolyte) is a necessary component of the corrosion cell.
In the presence of an electrolyte, a corrosion cell is formed with aluminum anodes and a steel cathode.
Ion chromatography analysis of the entire assembly would not reveal what caused the localized corrosion cell on one capacitor.
A three-electrode corrosion cell consisting of Ag/AgCl was used as the reference electrode, Pt as the counter electrode, and our test specimens (different percentages of zinc in Zn-Ni alloys) cleaned of corrosion products were used as the working electrode.
The more active of the two metals or alloys (the one that is lower in the electrochemical series) will become the anode in a corrosion cell and corrosion will begin at the point of contact with the cathode (the other metal).