cosmic


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cosmic

1. of or relating to the whole universe
2. occurring or originating in outer space, esp as opposed to the vicinity of the earth, the solar system, or the local galaxy

cosmic

[′käz·mik]
(astronomy)
Pertaining to the cosmos, the vast extraterrestrial regions of the universe.
References in periodicals archive ?
IceCube is using neutrinos, which are believed to accompany cosmic ray production, to explore these theories.
The ultimate answers may come from detectors even bigger than today's bulked-up cosmic ray hunters.
Cosmic Blobs is a registered trademark and/or a trademark in the United States and in other countries of SolidWorks Corporation, a Dassault Systemes S.
We are seeing young cosmic rays, with energies comparable to those produced by the most powerful particle accelerators on Earth," said co-author Luigi Tibaldo, a physicist at Padova University and the Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics.
After examining the data, Bilgili decided to widen the investigation and started looking into ties between the cosmic room and other landmark cases such as the Ergenekon case -- which investigated an alleged clandestine group nested in the military and the government -- and the Zirve Publishing House massacre case, in which three missionaries were killed by five ultranationalists in 2007.
Their findings indicated that overall, the contribution of changing solar activity, either directly or through cosmic rays, was even less cannot have contributed more than 10 per cent to global warming in the twentieth century.
Cosmic Case, trained by Jim Goldie, won 18 times, ten on the Flat and eight over hurdles, winning at all the Scottish courses.
With the increase in solar activity, the primary cosmic ray intensity has decreased by 9 per cent during the past 150 years leading to lesser cloud cover and reduced albedo radiation being reflected back into space.
The frequency of galactic cosmic rays hitting the earth is inversely correlated with solar activity (Wang, Sheeley, & Rouillard, 2006), which peaks once about every 11 years when the sun flips its magnetic pole (Howard & Labonte, 1980).
Using this idea, "black hole radiation" and "origin of cosmic rays" can be understood.
Topics include the cosmic microwave background, including the halo mass function in the dark ages, cosmic microwave background challenges to the standard model, and the role of the local void; those on cosmic dawn include redshift quasars and the Subaru telescope; those on large scale structure consider redshift-space distortions and dark energy; a number of papers describe galaxy formation and evolution, including those on age-dating the red sequence in low-redshift clusters; those on AGN evolution include the connection between black hole mass and dark matter halo mass; those on feedback and environment include constraining feedback in galaxy formation and mass and the morphology-density relation; and those on galaxy evolution and the environment include a survey.
Cosmic rays are particles that travel from space into Earth's atmosphere.