cosmic background radiation

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cosmic background radiation

Unresolved radiation from space. The cumulative effect of many unresolved – and individually weak – discrete sources provides the background at radio, X-ray, and possibly other wavelengths. One important form is the microwave background radiation, which peaks at about 1 mm wavelength (i.e. a frequency of 3 × 1010 hertz). This is considered to be due to the hot Big Bang. See also COBE; gamma-ray astronomy; infrared background radiation; radio source; X-ray background radiation.

cosmic background radiation

[′käz·mik ¦bak‚grau̇nd ‚rād·ē‚ā·shən]
References in periodicals archive ?
In the subsequent section, we also discuss plausible extension of this proposed unified statistics to include anisotropic effect, which may be observed in the context of Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation.
WMAP has made a map of the temperature fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background radiation with much higher resolution, sensitivity, and accuracy than satellites that came before it.
It wasn't until the mid-1960s that scientists using radio astronomy discovered cosmic microwave background radiation and pushed the Big Bang theory into prominence.
This spring, the European Space Agency is launching its Planck spacecraft, which will study cosmic microwave background radiation.
Weeks and his collaborators were drawn to study the dodecahedron because recent observations of the universe's cosmic microwave background radiation have suggested that the universe either is flat or has slightly positive curvature, such as a sphere does.
Before that, the universe was so hot that there were no neutral atoms, only ions and electrons that trapped the cosmic microwave background radiation.
We tested void models against the latest data, including subtle features in the cosmic microwave background radiation - the afterglow of the Big Bang - and ripples in the large-scale distribution of matter," said Zibin.
Burbidge and his colleagues assert that their theory, known as quasi-steady state cosmology (QSSC), recently predicts the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation, a feat that the Big Bang model can't as yet accomplish.