cot


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cot

1
Nautical a hammock-like bed with a stiff frame

cot

2
1. Literary or archaic a small cottage
2. another name for fingerstall

cot

(mathematics)

cot

A small house or cottage.
References in classic literature ?
All sorts of pleas for a reconsideration were made, but the packers were obdurate; and all the while they were reducing wages, and heading off shipments of cattle, and rushing in wagonloads of mattresses and cots.
Fight which you will - us or the enemy you'll never lie in that cot again, and there's more glory and maybe less kicks from fightin' the enemy.
One Evening in December as my Father, my Mother and myself, were arranged in social converse round our Fireside, we were on a sudden greatly astonished, by hearing a violent knocking on the outward door of our rustic Cot.
He looked toward the cot by the fire where the godling snorted.
Get him a glass of sherry, then, and let him squat on the cot.
Dawn showed a very white-faced Subaltern sitting on the side of a sick man's cot, and a Doctor in the doorway using language unfit for publication.
Mowgli heard the strings of the cot crack under the great brute's weight.
They were only concerned that the house could accommodate no more; and yet perhaps, by "putting the children away in the maid's room, or swinging a cot somewhere," they could hardly bear to think of not finding room for two or three besides, supposing they might wish to stay; though, with regard to any attendance on Miss Musgrove, there need not be the least uneasiness in leaving her to Mrs Harville's care entirely.
The cradle-rockers had done hard duty for so many years, under the weight of so many children, on that flagstone floor, that they were worn nearly flat, in consequence of which a huge jerk accompanied each swing of the cot, flinging the baby from side to side like a weaver's shuttle, as Mrs Durbeyfield, excited by her song, trod the rocker with all the spring that was left in her after a long day's seething in the suds.
The Chink's Head was a name the beach-combers gave to a wretched inn off the Rue Bouterie, kept by a one-eyed Chinaman, where for six sous you could sleep in a cot and for three on the floor.
Two single rooms, and if you've got such a thing we'd rather like a cot in one of them.
Never to return,'" muttered D'Arnot, and threw himself face downward upon the cot.