cot death


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cot death

the unexplained sudden death of an infant during sleep
References in periodicals archive ?
Cot death is also more likely to affect boys - 56% to 44% for girls - and the babies of younger mothers.
Falling asleep with your baby on the sofa greatly increases the risk of cot death.
The fears about cot death were far higher than concerns about meningitis (16%), stillbirth (11%) and accidents (11%).
Researchers estimated that 40% of cot death cases could be prevented if parents only brought children into their beds for comfort and feeding, but not sleeping.
The study, published in BMJ Open, shows the risk associated with bed sharing decreases as a baby gets older, with the peak period for instances of cot death between seven and 10 weeks.
And William - who appeared in the Sunday Mail in 1986 when he was helped by the newly formed Scottish Cot Death Trust - is highlighting the charity's new Next Infant Support Programme.
Following the uncertainties of birth, cot death is every new mum, and dad's, biggest fear.
But there are some ways of reducing the danger of cot death, including stopping your baby getting too hot and putting it in the right position to sleep.
Of the 80 cot deaths, more than half occurred while cosleeping, compared to onefifth co-sleeping rate among both control groups.
A fifth of cot death infants were found with a pillow and a quarter were swaddled, suggesting potentially new risk factors emerging.
Overall, there has been a dramatic drop in the rate of cot death in the UK since the early nineties, which researchers say could be due to some of the safety messages getting across successfully.
The risks of cot death are greater if a baby sleeps in bed with its parents, especially if they are smokers.