Cothurni

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Cothurni

 

(also buskins), the footwear worn by actors in ancient Greek and Roman tragic drama. It had very thick soles, which increased the stature of the actor and made him more visible in the large theaters of antiquity. Cothurni also imparted a stately solemnity to the actor’s appearance and gait. The word “cothurnus” has become a general term meaning a stilted spirit of grandeur.

References in periodicals archive ?
It is my sense that we should read the problematic declaration that we will be reading a "tragoedia" and ascending to the cothurnus less in terms of the tale's ending and more in terms of its elevated and literary nature.
Originally, a single actor, the hypocrites, elevated by the cothurnus, dressed in black or purple and with his face enlarged by a mask, shared the scene with the twelve individuals of the chorus.