cotinga

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cotinga

(kōtĭng`gə), any of the New World tropical birds of the family Cotingidae. Cotingas range from N Argentina to the southern border of the United States; most are forest species and inhabit the highest treetops. Although there is great variation in appearance among these birds, all have broad bills with slightly hooked tips, rounded wings, and strong short legs. Some species are dull-colored, with little difference between males and females; in many species, however, the males are brightly colored and have curiously modified wing and head feathers. The umbrella birds (genus Cephalopterus), found from Central America to Argentina, have a black, umbrellalike crest, which is raised and expanded during courtship displays, and feathered throat wattles nearly as long as the bird itself. The bellbirds (genus Procnias), found from Central America to Argentina, have a distinctive bell-like call; they are marked by feather-studded, fleshy protuberances drooping over their bills. Both the male and the female cock-of-the-rock (genus Rupicola) are marked by a fan-shaped crest of feathers, which extends from bill tip to the top of the head. There are two cock-of-the-rock species; in R. rupicola, of the Guianas, the male is golden-orange with black wings and tail, while in R. peruviana, of the Andes, the male is bright red with similar markings. In both species the female is olive brown. The cock-of-the-rock, a terrestrial bird, performs a communal mating ritual in which males go through stylized stances and acrobatics. There are about 90 species of cotingas classified in 33 genera of the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Passeriformes, family Cotingidae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Breeding data for the Guianan Red Cotinga are largely absent, birds in breeding condition (developed gonads and/or brood patch) have been collected between September and October in Surinam (Kirwan and Grenn 2011) and in April, in Amapa, Brazil (Novaes 1978).
This lack of nest duties may have freed up her time to spend the day wandering through lowland forest to feed on fruit with other small groups of cotingas.
Additionally, in Panama, Yellow-billed Cotingas have been regularly observed feeding on fruit trees in pasture adjacent to mangroves (Angehr 2000), highlighting the importance of the availability of food resources near mangrove habitat.
Despite tracking only three birds, this study makes it clear that Yellow-billed Cotingas use intact mangroves, lowland forest, and forest borders along riparian areas and fruit trees adjacent to mangroves in order to persist.
APPENDIX: Tree species where at least 1 of 3 radio-tagged Yellow- billed Cotingas (Carpodectes antoniae) were observed feeding at the Rincon River mangrove estuary Osa Peninsula, Puntarenas, Costa Rica in 2011.
Phylogenetic relationships of the cotingas (Passeriformes: Cotingidae).
A preliminary phylogenetic hypothesis for the cotingas (Cotingidae) based on mitochondrial DNA.
I highly recommend it to anyone with a strong interest in Neotropical birds, and cannot imagine why anyone with more specialized interest in the manakins and cotingas could possibly fail to own it.
The Swallow-tailed Cotinga is considered near threatened (IUCN 2010) and a high research priority (Parker et al.
First Bolivian observation of Swallow-tailed Cotinga Phibalura flavirostris boliviana in 98 years.
Flight display and interspecific aggressive behaviour in Chestnut-crested Cotinga Ampelion rufaxilla.
An additional specimen of the Swallow-tailed Cotinga Phibalura flavirostris boliviana.