cottage window

cottage window

A double-hung window having its upper sash smaller than the lower sash; the upper pane is often decorated.
References in classic literature ?
Philip's eyes wandered out of the window where it was bright and sunny still; there were little white curtains in it tied up with red ribbon like those of a cottage window, and on the sill were pots of geraniums.
We stared with all our eyes, and there, yes, there, far ahead of us, was a faint, glimmering spot, no larger than a cottage window pane.
So the tiny woman closed the shutter of the cottage window and fastened the door, and trembling from head to foot for fear that any one should suspect her, opened a very secret place and showed the Princess a shadow.
She drew in a long whiff and puffed it forth again into the bar of morning sunshine which struggled through the one dusty pane of her cottage window.
But Hepzibah did not see that, just as there comes a warm sunbeam into every cottage window, so comes a lovebeam of God's care and pity for every separate need.
As if the sun should stop when he had kindled his fires up to the splendor of a moon or a star of the sixth magnitude, and go about like a Robin Goodfellow, peeping in at every cottage window, inspiring lunatics, and tainting meats, and making darkness visible, instead of steadily increasing his genial heat and beneficence till he is of such brightness that no mortal can look him in the face, and then, and in the meanwhile too, going about the world in his own orbit, doing it good, or rather, as a truer philosophy has discovered, the world going about him getting good.
The village of Barton was chiefly on one of these hills, and formed a pleasant view from the cottage windows.
This was proclaimed in white letters a foot long spaced widely across the stern (somewhat like the lettering of a shop-sign) under the cottage windows.
The lights began to glimmer in the cottage windows, and I could discern the inmates as they gathered in comfort and security every man with his wife and children by their own evening hearth.
Out of the low cottage window she could see a tiny, triangular green with the village sign, a bench and an apple tree.
Peering into the poolside cottage window, Gabriel saw his father's body, rang the police and implicated his mother in the killing.
Two decades later, Bronwen's memory lives on, not only through the hotel she started but also through a nearby footbridge that bears her name - testimony to her dogged campaign to ensure pedestrians had some protection from the dangerous traffic she used to observe with mounting concern from her cottage window.