cotter

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cotter

1 Machinery
1. any part, such as a pin, wedge, key, etc., that is used to secure two other parts so that relative motion between them is prevented
2. short for cotter pin

cotter

2
1. English history a villein in late Anglo-Saxon and early Norman times occupying a cottage and land in return for labour
2. a peasant occupying a cottage and land in the Scottish Highlands under the same tenure as an Irish cottier

cotter

[′käd·ər]
(design engineering)
A tapered piece that can be driven in a tapered hole to hold together an assembly of machine or structural parts.

cotter

A beveled piece of wood or steel, used as a wedge for fastening.
References in periodicals archive ?
Oh well, Mr Cottar would understand if she came back some other time to give him the money - she wouldn't forget, but she was in a hurry.
The term cottar commonly imports the occupier of a dwelling with or without some small portion of land, whose main subsistence is by the wages of labour, and whose rent, if any, is paid to a tenant and not to the landlord.
When a small to middling 800kw Enercon turbine can gross PS180,000 a year, about half of which will be subsidised out of our electricity bills, no wonder every cottar with half an acre of land is climbing on the band wagon.
Unemployed Dunlop, of Cottar Street, Maryhill, was originally charged with attempted murder but yesterday the Crown accepted a guilty plea to the reduced charge of assault to the danger of life.
Unemployed Dunlop, of Cottar Street, Maryhill, Glasgow, was originally charged with attempting to murder the baby on December 10 last year.
Northfield had seven villeins, 16 bordars, six cottars or cottagers, two serfs (probably male slaves), and one female bondswoman (slave) - and their families.
In recent times many artists steeped in the region's Celtic-Canadian heritage have become international stars in the folk and country music industries, including fiddlers Natalie MacMaster (1973-) and Ashley MacIsaac (1975-), vocalist Mary Jane Lamond (1960-), and ensembles the Cottars and the Rankins.
Labor in the countryside was supplied by four groups of people--(1) the tenant who owed labor services to the master of the ground; (2) the cottars who were settled on the fermions, each with a cothouse and yard; (3) the unmarried laborers, of then the relatives of tenants and cottars; and (4) a group of skilled workers such as ploughmen, barnmen or threshers, shepherds, sawyers, and limeburners; and some of these needed alternative work out of season.