cotton root rot

cotton root rot

[′kät·ən ′rüt ‚rät]
(plant pathology)
A fungus disease of cotton caused by Phymatotrichum omnivorum and marked by bronzing of the foliage followed by sudden wilting and death of the plant.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Differentiation of isolates of cotton root rot pathogens Rizoctonia solani and R.
Integrated control of cotton root rot disease by mixing fungal biocontrol agents and resistance inducers.
David Appel, professor of plant pathology and Texas A&M AgriLife extension specialist, told Wines & Vines that cotton root rot has replaced Pierce's disease as the major disease of concern in the Texas Hill Country and Gulf Coast viticultural regions.
One product, flutriafol (also known as TopGuard Terra), which had been created to control soybean rust, appeared to control cotton root rot in cotton.
Repeated trials proved to the team that flutriafol was effective in controlling cotton root rot disease in vineyards.
But Yang, who is with the USDA Agricultural Research Service in College Station, Texas, began evaluating whether aerial imagery could spot problem areas within cotton fields when growers started using a new fungicide to control cotton root rot.
Working with Texas A&M AgriLife scientists, Yang mounted two digital cameras on the underside of a small airplane, equipped them with GPS, and took images of cotton fields to see whether they could identify areas with cotton root rot.
Yang, working with Texas A&M AgriLife scientists, began evaluating whether aerial imagery could spot specific problem sites in cotton fields when, a few years ago, growers started using a new fungicide for cotton root rot control.
Yang and his colleagues mounted two digital cameras on the underside of a small airplane, equipped them with GPS, and took images of cotton fields to see whether they could identify areas with cotton root rot.
On top of that, a soilborne fungus called cotton root rot, with the scary scientific name of Phymatotrichopsis omnivora, has added Franklinia to its hit list of some 2,000 species of plants.
If the cotton root rot is the problem, it is a pretty intractable one.