countable


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countable

[′kau̇nt·ə·bəl]
(mathematics)
Either finite or denumerable. Also known as enumerable.

countable

(mathematics)
A term describing a set which is isomorphic to a subet of the natural numbers. A countable set has "countably many" elements. If the isomorphism is stated explicitly then the set is called "a counted set" or "an enumeration".

Examples of countable sets are any finite set, the natural numbers, integers, and rational numbers. The real numbers and complex numbers are not
References in periodicals archive ?
infinity]] is not separable, meaning that it has no countable dense subsets.
ii) Intuitionistic fuzzy strongly S-Lindelof [2] if each intuitionistic fuzzy closed cover of X has a countable sub cover for X.
Since X is first countable, then x has a countable neighborhood base {[G.
In section 2, it argues that while the Generalized Halfer Principle is compatible with Countable Additivity (CA), the Generalized Thirder Principle (GTP) is not.
The WPR in TANF is an important measure that should be maintained, but must be tempered with the recognition that many reasonable work preparatory activities are no longer countable as they were prior to the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005.
6) Despite these national rules, the way countable income and countable resources are determined varies substantially across states.
only countable many), somewhere in the non-finite ordinals the construction has to settle onto a fixed point, delivering the ultimate extension of 'true sentence'.
Our interest as citizens of Abyei is to a have a government countable to her citizens.
Following [2]) We say that the topological space (X, T) is hereditarily Lindelof if each open cover of any subset of X has a countable subcover.
To understand the latter you need some grammatical awareness (of the distinction between countable and uncountable nouns); to understand the former, you don't.
On the asset side, both Mary's and Bob's assets (resources) are included, and Bob must exhaust the countable resources so they are at or below $2,000.
Key new detections include confusions between countable and non-countable nouns (much/many, less/fewer), comparative/superlative mismatches (more nicer, less nicest), and recognition of run-on sentences.