countess


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countess

1. the wife or widow of a count or earl
2. a woman of the rank of count or earl
References in classic literature ?
Then we must not reproach each other, monsieur, for the sight of the countess has almost killed my friend, Monsieur de Sucy.
Add, furthermore, that he had white and shapely hands, of which he was as careful as a pretty woman should be; add that he seemed to be very well informed, and was decidedly clever, and it should not be difficult for you to imagine that my traveling companion was more than worthy of a countess.
The Countess was a little woman, with a flat, graceful figure and enchanting shape; so fragile, so dainty was she, that you would have feared to break some bone if you so much as touched her.
But now her position in life is assured," continued Caderousse; "no doubt fortune and honors have comforted her; she is rich, a countess, and yet" -- Caderousse paused.
It was generally agreed in New York that the Countess Olenska had "lost her looks.
These things passed through Newland Archer's mind a week later as he watched the Countess Olenska enter the van der Luyden drawing-room on the evening of the momentous dinner.
Ever since the morning, carriages with six horses had been coming and going continually, bringing visitors to the Countess Rostova's big house on the Povarskaya, so well known to all Moscow.
The countess was a woman of about forty-five, with a thin Oriental type of face, evidently worn out with childbearing- she had had twelve.
When he inquired if anybody knew the Countess Narona, he was answered by something like a shout of astonishment.
Descending to particulars, each member of the club contributed his own little stock of scandal to the memoirs of the Countess.
Five minutes later there came in a friend of Kitty's, married the preceding winter, Countess Nordston.
It seems presumption on my part to make such a suggestion perhaps," he said slowly, "but I really believe that the Countess is in earnest with reference to her desire for seclusion just at present.