count

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count

1
1. the act of counting or reckoning
2. the number reached by counting; sum
3. Law a paragraph in an indictment containing a distinct and separate charge
4. Physics the total number of photons or ionized particles detected by a counter
5. Boxing Wrestling the act of telling off a number of seconds by the referee, as when a boxer has been knocked down or a wrestler pinned by his opponent
6. out for the count Boxing knocked out and unable to continue after a count of ten by the referee
7. take the count Boxing to be unable to continue after a count of ten

count

2
1. a nobleman in any of various European countries having a rank corresponding to that of a British earl
2. any of various officials in the late Roman Empire and under various Germanic kings in the early Middle Ages
3. a man who has received an honour (papal knighthood) from the Pope in recognition of good deeds, achievements, etc.

Count

 

(Russian, graf; from German Graf), in Western Europe during the early Middle Ages, a royal servitor. Beginning in the second half of the sixth century, a count in the Frankish state possessed his own district—the county—with judicial, administrative, and military authority. Gradually the post of count became hereditary. In the period of feudal disintegration, the count was a feudal sovereign; then, at the end of this period, he became a high aristocrat. The title of count is maintained to this day in most European countries with a monarchical form of government.

In Russia the title of graf was introduced in the 18th century by Peter I and was abolished in 1917.

count

[kau̇nt]
(aerospace engineering)
To proceed from one point to another in a countdown or plus count, normally by calling a number to signify the point reached.
To proceed in a countdown, for example, T minus 90 and counting.
(chemistry)
An ionizing event.
(design engineering)
The number of openings per linear inch in a wire cloth.
(mathematics)
To name a set of consecutive positive integers in order of size, usually starting with 1.
To associate consecutive positive integers, starting with 1, with the members of a finite set in order to determine the cardinal number of the set.
(nucleonics)
A single response of the counting system in a radiation counter.
The total number of events indicated by a counter.
(textiles)
The number of warp and filling threads per square inch of fabric.

count

In wire cloth, the number of openings per linear inch.
References in classic literature ?
I was awakened by the Count, who looked at me as grimly as a man could look as he said, "Tomorrow, my friend, we must part.
The Count stood up, and said, with a sweet courtesy which made me rub my eyes, it seemed so real, "You English have a saying which is close to my heart, for its spirit is that which rules our boyars, `Welcome the coming, speed the parting guest.
I knew than that to struggle at the moment against the Count was useless.
Yes," continued the count, "it was at first arranged in this way; but I think since yesterday some change has taken place in the order of the ceremony.
The mandaia* never fails, never trembles, never strikes thirty times ineffectually, like the soldier who beheaded the Count of Chalais, and to whose tender mercy Richelieu had doubtless recommended the sufferer.
Really, count," replied Franz, "one would think that you had studied the different tortures of all the nations of the world.
The man who had accused De Coude, and the two others who had been playing, stood looking expectantly at the count.
And then, as the others still hesitated to do so: "Come, I shall do it myself if no other will," and he stepped forward toward the count.
The count went dead white, and then very slowly he withdrew his hand, and in it were three cards.
And why not," asked the Count, "when your meaning can be explained by anybody in two words?
Laura looked at the Count with her dislike for him appearing a little too plainly in her face.
And if Count Fosco must divide murderers into classes, I think he has been very unfortunate in his choice of expressions.