covariant


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covariant

[kō′ver·ē·ənt]
(relativity)
A scalar, vector, or higher-order tensor.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the next section for a theory of "lepto-electro-gravity" we have two covariant gauge fields and one contravariant one.
This covariant functoriality was introduced by Content, Lemay and Leroux [9].
a], where ([MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) is the universal covariant representation of [H.
holds for any vector fields X, Y, Z where A, B and C are 1-forms (non zero simultaneously) and [nabla] is the operator of covariant differentiation with respect to the Lorentzian metric g.
Five-dimensional fully covariant Kaluza-Klein cosmology with scalar field dark energy.
Hence, this study also found an HoV effect with fuels for which HoV and octane sensitivity were covariant.
The statistical analysis were divided into the following steps, according to the parameters for evidence of validity (AERA, APA, & NCME, 1999): (i) To investigate validity evidences for TLN-C in its relations with external criteria, comparison of means between ages was done using analysis of covariance (Ancova), in which age was the factor and intellectual quotient (WISC-III) was the covariant.
In contrast with (18) ([MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], with partial derivatives), (55) (with covariant derivatives) "does not generally express any conservation law whatever" [2].
Then, the covariant components of Riemann tensors on S are defined by
In 1925, Levy [12] proved that "A second order covariant constant nonsingular symmetric tensor in a space of constant curvature is proportional to the metric tensor.
The idiosyncratic risks faced by the women workers at individual and household level (Micro) and the covariant risks faced at community level (Meso) and national / international (Macro) level are shown in the table.