Covenanter


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Covenanter

a person upholding the National Covenant of 1638 or the Solemn League and Covenant of 1643 between Scotland and England to establish and defend Presbyterianism
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References in periodicals archive ?
Before that, tomorrow, John Sadler - co-author of The Great Siege of Newcastle, 1644 - will deliver a talk, 372 years to the day since a Covenanter army from Scotland stormed the town during the English Civil War.
By restoring Covenanter grave stones, for example, Old Mortality not only creates a sacred space that is largely hidden from outsiders, he also reinscribes the lines separating believers from nonbelievers.
As Crawford Gribben states, for Scott writing or reading about the Covenanter tragedy was a political and theological task (16).
14) For example, after the Battle of Philliphaugh in 1645 the Covenanter army slaughtered all prisoners including women and children to the cry of "Jesus and no quarter" (Smout 64).
A covenant-not-to-compete is almost always the separate property of the individual covenanter.
When Charles II imposed episcopacy on the Kirk in 1662, a period of Covenanter defiance and government repression followed.
37) At the Glorious Revolution, complained one Irish Covenanter, `the Government did usurp and arrogate an Erastian and Antichristian Supremacy, encroaching upon the prerogative of the Lord Jesus Christ, his incommunicable Headship and Kingship'.
In his study of Robert Burns intended for the Encyclopedia Britannica and at first rejected as being 'too frankly critical and too little in accordance with Scotch tradition', Stevenson is too much a moralist, the Conscience of the Covenanter, in conflict with the Bohemian he always at heart remained.
Born near Hawick in Roxburghshire, his father a small tailor of Covenanter stock (a Covenanter was a person who upheld the National Covenant of 1638 or the Solemn League and Covenant of 1643 between England and Scotland, with the end of establishing and defending the Presbyterian faith).
Analysis concluded they were those of Scottish Covenanter soldiers taken prisoner after the Battle of Dunbar, one of the most brutal battles of the civil wars in the three kingdoms.
It may come as a surprise to many readers that Presbyterian women, before and after the restoration of Scotland's established Kirk were active in prayer societies and field preaching promoting the Covenanter cause.
In less than an hour at the Battle of Dunbar, the English Parliamentarian army, under the com mand of Oliver Cromwell, defeated the Scottish Covenanter army, which supported the claims of Charles II to the Scottish throne.