Greed

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Related to covetousness: 7 Deadly Sins

Greed

See also Stinginess.
Almayer’s Folly
lust for gold leads to decline. [Br. Lit.: Almayer’s Folly]
Alonso
Shakespearean symbol of avarice. [Br. Lit.: The Tempest]
Béline
fans husband’s hypochondria to get his money. [Fr. Lit.: Le Malade Imaginaire]
Barak’s wife
agrees to sell shadow, symbol of her fertility. [Aust. Opera: R. Strauss, Woman Without a Shadow, Westerman, 432]
Brown, Joe
turns in partner Joe Christmas for reward money. [Am. Lit.: Light in August]
Common Lot, The
the get-rich-quick club. [Am. Lit.: The Common Lot, Hart, 369]
Crawley, Pitt
inherits, marries, and hoards money. [Br. Lit.: Vanity Fair]
Eugénie Grandet
wealth as raison d’être. [Fr. Lit.: Eugenie Grandet, Magill I, 258–260]
Financier, The
riches as raison d’être. [Am. Lit.: The Financier, Magill I, 280–282]
Gehazi
behind master’s back, takes money he declined. [O.T.: II Kings 5:21–22]
Griffiths, Clyde
insatiable desire for wealth causes his downfall. [Am. Lit.: An American Tragedy]
Hoard, Walkadine
hastily marries courtesan posing as wealthy widow. [Br. Lit.: A Trick to Catch the Old One]
Kibroth-hattaavah
Hebrew place name: where greedy were buried. [O.T.: Numbers, 11:33–35]
Lucre, Pecunious
duped into succoring profligate nephew by lure of a fortune. [Br. Lit.: A Trick To Catch the Old One]
Mammon
avaricious fallen angel. [Br. Lit.: Paradise Lost]
Mammon, Sir Epicure
avaricious knight; seeks philosopher’s stone for Midas touch. [Br. Lit.: The Alchemist]
Mansion, The
shows material advantages of respectability winning over kinship. [Am. Lit.: The Mansion, Hart, 520]
Midas
greedy king whose touch turned everything to gold. [Classical Myth.: Bulfinch, 42–44]
Montgomery
mercenary chief proverbially kept for himself all the booty. [Fr. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 618]
Naboth’s Vineyard
another’s possession gotten, by hook or crook. [O.T.: I Kings, 21]
New Grub Street
place of ruthless contest among moneymongers. [Br. Lit.: New Grub Street, Magill I, 647–649]
Osmond, Gilbert
marries Isabel Archer for her money. [Am. Lit.: The Portrait of a Lady, Magill I, 766–768]
Overreach, Sir Giles
grasping usurer, unscrupulous and ambitious. [Br. Lit.: A New Way to Pay Old Debts, Wheeler, 275]
Pardoner’s Tale
three brothers kill each other for treasure. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales, “Pardoner’s Tale”]
pig
medieval symbol of avarice. [Art: Hall, 247]
Putnam, Abbie
marries old man in anticipation of inheritance. [Am. Lit.: Desire Under the Elms]
Scrooge, Ebenezer
byword for greedy miser. [Br. Lit.: A Christmas Carol]
Sisyphus
condemned to impossible task for his avarice. [Gk. Myth.: Wheeler, 1011]
References in periodicals archive ?
Covetousness is cancerous to our humanity, and every spiritual tradition in the world warns us against its perils.
Covetousness, for example, is identified as the primary Vice of the play in Bernard Spivak's Shakespeare and the Allegory of Evil (New York: Columbia University Press, 1958), 143.
This leads us to the key point we should note about the passage overall: just as Aquinas frames his discussion of the perfection of charity in terms of the lessening and eliminating of covetousness, so does Dogen frame his elaboration of the exercise of compassion in terms of the lessening and eliminating of covetousness.
The Macbeths' restlessness, violence, and covetousness have
671/1273) manual on simple living entitled "The subduing of greed through abstinence and contentment and the repelling of the humiliation of beggary through handwritten requests and intercession" (Qam al-Hirsi bil-Zuhdi wal-Qana'a wa-Raddu Dhulli al-Su'ali bil-Kutbi wal-Shafa'a), which Maliki-trained South Africa lawyer Ahmad Ali al-Adani renders as "The curbing of covetousness by doing-without and contentment, and repelling the abasement of asking by books and intercession" (p.
Pride, sloth, gluttony, lust, covetousness, anger and envy.
In this brief historical review we are not concerned with examining foreign covetousness in Lebanon.
The first, by Marjorie Leach (Sister Mary Florienne) in 1932, mentions "numerous stories of these early days [that] illustrate the ferocity, covetousness and revengefulness of the uncivilized Maori.
envy: a feeling of discontent or covetousness with regard to another's advantages, success, possessions
Covetousness (whether for riches, power or prestige) has been christened by contemporary society; now it's called ambition, discriminating taste, wanting "the good life," a.
In contrast, the Papa Damnatus faces the ultimate penalty for his covetousness and simony, while the damned emperor and king belatedly show remorse for their covetousness, manslaughter, gluttony, lechery, and lack of pity for the poor and the sick.