craft


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craft

1. an occupation or trade requiring special skill, esp manual dexterity
2. 
a. the members of such a trade, regarded collectively
b. (as modifier): a craft guild
3. a single vessel, aircraft, or spacecraft
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References in classic literature ?
It had never been given me to see such deadly accuracy of aim, and it seemed as though a little figure on one of the craft dropped at the explosion of each bullet, while the banners and upper works dissolved in spurts of flame as the irresistible projectiles of our warriors mowed through them.
Several of the craft were limping perceptibly, and seemed but barely under the control of their depleted crews.
At last calm was restored, and eventually the apes became accustomed to the strange antics of their craft, after which no more trouble was experienced with them.
The therns fired upon them through shields affixed to their rifles, but on, steadily on, came the grim, black craft.
The second brother also met a man, who, when he found out what he was setting out upon, asked him what craft he meant to follow.
To penalize a yacht in proportion to the fineness of her performance is unfair to the craft and to her men.
After him came Woola and I, closer now, for the man was too intent upon forcing his craft up the river to have any eyes for what might be transpiring behind him.
Carthoris' improvement upon this consisted of an auxiliary device which steered the craft mechanically in the direction of the compass, and upon arrival directly over the point for which the compass was set, brought the craft to a standstill and lowered it, also automatically, to the ground.
The wind was strong and it was with difficulty that she maneuvered the craft from the hangar without accident, but once away it raced swiftly out above the twin cities.
The boat containing the exploring party and Val Jacinto took the lead, the baggage craft following.
The pilot had hung out his lights, which was very necessary in these seas crowded with vessels bound landward; for collisions are not uncommon occurrences, and, at the speed she was going, the least shock would shatter the gallant little craft.
He shouted word back to others of his fleet--word that was passed back until it had reached them all--directing them to run alongside the strangers and board them, for with his two hundred craft and his eight or ten thousand warriors he evidently felt equal to over-coming the fifty vessels of the enemy, which did not seem to carry over three thousand men all told.