cranberry

(redirected from cranberry juice)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

cranberry,

low creeping evergreen bogbog,
very old lake without inlet or outlet that becomes acid and is gradually overgrown with a characteristic vegetation (see swamp). Peat moss, or sphagnum, grows around the edge of the open water of a bog (peat is obtained from old bogs) and out on the surface.
..... Click the link for more information.
 plant of the genus Oxycoccus of the family Ericaceae (heathheath,
in botany, common name for some members of the Ericaceae, a family of chiefly evergreen shrubs with berry or capsule fruits. Plants of the heath family form the characteristic vegetation of many regions with acid soils, particularly the moors, swamps, and mountain slopes
..... Click the link for more information.
 family). Cranberries are considered by some botanists to belong to the blueberry genus Vaccinium. The cultivated species is the native American or large cranberry (O. or V. macrocarpus). The tart red berries are used for sauces, jellies, pies, and beverages. The Massachusetts colonists probably served wild cranberries with turkey at the first harvest feast in 1621, establishing a Thanksgiving tradition. Commercial cultivation began in Massachusetts in the early 19th cent., then in New Jersey and Wisconsin, later in Washington and Oregon and in Canada. United States cranberry acreage now totals c.25,000. Massachusetts leads in production, followed by Wisconsin and New Jersey. Cranberry bogs are flooded to control weeds, to protect against cold, and to facilitate harvesting. Cranberry is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
..... Click the link for more information.
, class Magnoliopsida, order Ericales, family Ericaceae. The high-bush cranberry or cranberry tree, a member of the honeysucklehoneysuckle,
common name for some members of the Caprifoliaceae, a family comprised mostly of vines and shrubs of the Northern Hemisphere, especially abundant in E Asia and E North America.
..... Click the link for more information.
 family, is unrelated.

Bibliography

See P. Eck, The American Cranberry (1990).

Enlarge picture
cranberry

cranberry

Red tart berries, small leathery shiny oval leaves that stay green year round on wiry stems, white/pink flowers. Used for pleurisy and lung infections. Cranberry may help prevent urinary tract infections, kill viruses and bacteria, prevent kidney stones, soothes rectal disturbances, diarrhea, cystitis. More of a preventative measure than curative. Do not consume if taking Warfarin.

cranberry

[′kran‚ber·ē]
(botany)
Any of several plants of the genus Vaccinium, especially V. macrocarpon, in the order Ericales, cultivated for its small, edible berries.

cranberry

any of several trailing ericaceous shrubs of the genus Vaccinium, such as the European V. oxycoccus, that bear sour edible red berries
References in periodicals archive ?
For more than 80 years, consumers have enjoyed the big, bold taste of Ocean Spray's Cranberry Juice Cocktail straight from the bog.
Cranberry is approved as a GRAS ingredient and, therefore, bears no general risk with regard to regular consumption; however, none of the human studies with cranberries, cranberry juice, concentrate or dry forms has evaluated the effect of 8 weeks of consumption.
Clearly, juicemakers are still far from having the "significant scientific agreement" that the Food and Drug Administration would require before allowing health claims about urinary tract infections on cranberry juice labels.
In a recent study conducted by the University of British Columbia and published in The Journal of Urology, scientists found that cranberry juice, when consumed by children suffering from recurring UTIs over a one-year period, reduced the risk of urinary tract infections in children by two-thirds, versus the placebo.
In a statement in September 2003 the committee said: "Until this possible interaction between cranberry juice and warfarin has been investigated further, it would be prudent for patients taking warfarin to be advised to limit or avoid drinking it.
A Cochrane review identified only five trials of at least 1 month's duration; four compared cranberry juice with placebo juice or water, and one compared dried cranberry capsules with placebo (Cochrane Database Syst.
Exposure to cranberry juice prevented adhesion in 31 of 39 isolates, including 19 of the 24 resistant isolates; antiadhesion activity began within 2 hours and persisted for up to 10 hours.
In a recent study from Harvard Medical School, women who drank a little over a cup of cranberry juice cocktail a day were twice as likely to be cured of their urinary tract infections as women who drank a look-alike, taste-alike beverage with no cranberry juice.
In the Canadian study, 100 women who had at least two urinary tract infections during the past year were given either cranberry pills (the researchers were fuzzy on how much) or three cups of cranberry juice every day.
Due to this robust profile of polyphenols, our team sought to evaluate the immediate vascular impact of drinking one, 450 ml (or 16 ounces) glass of cranberry juice with a different range of concentrations of cranberry-polyphenols.
The health benefits of cranberry juice include giving consumers relief from urinary tract infection, respiratory disorders and kidney stones.
Cranberry juice and tablets, on the other hand, help prevent UTIs (by stopping bacteria from attaching to the urinary tract), and do not have adverse effects or increase drug resistance.