cranial capacity


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cranial capacity

[′krān·ē·əl kə′pas·əd·ē]
(anatomy)
The volume of the cranial cavity.
References in periodicals archive ?
They are also getting bigger brains, because we found this increase in cranial capacity as well," he stated.
Since Darwin and Wallace, we've learned much about the increase in cranial capacity among hominids over the past 4 million years.
These earliest representatives of Homo are much shorter than modern Homo sapiens but possess a somewhat larger mean cranial capacity than that of the australopithecines, averaging 640 cc (range 590 to about 700 cc).
Unclear as to whether the Boskops belonged to a species separate from our own, Lynch and Granger suggest that, because their brains were nearly 30 percent larger than ours (with an average cranial capacity of 1750 cc), their prefrontal cortices may have measured as much as 53 percent greater.
For the study, Dunbar and colleague Eiluned Pearce measured the skulls of 55 individuals from 12 different populations, focusing on the dimensions for orbital volume and cranial capacity.
The implication of [the South African specimen's] surprising cranial capacity is that something is very wrong with the published record of early hominid cranial capacities," writes anthropologist Dean Falk of the State University of New York at Albany in an accompanying comment.
The cranial capacity of LB1 was just over 400 cm, making it more similar to the brains of a chimpanzee or bipedal "ape-men" of East and South Africa.
But Morbeck and Zihlman find that the cranial capacity, tooth size and body proportions of 10 Gombe skeletons lie within the range of 60 common chimpanzee skeletons from other locations and are distinct from measurements of 25 pygmy chimpanzee skeletons.
They found that population density had the biggest effect on skull size and thus cranial capacity.
Its cranial capacity, she says, falls well within the range for western European male Neanderthals.
Australopithecines walked on two legs and early Homo had a slightly larger cranial capacity, but this didn't necessarily correlate with prolonged growth and development.
The changes are in the direction of a modern profile, reports Wolpoff in the justreleased Fall 1984 PALEOBIOLOGY; cranial capacity expands while jaw and tooth size shrinks.