suture

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suture

1. Surgery
a. catgut, silk thread, or wire used to stitch together two bodily surfaces
b. the surgical seam formed after joining two surfaces
2. Anatomy a type of immovable joint, esp between the bones of the skull (cranial suture)
3. Zoology a line of junction in a mollusc shell, esp the line between adjacent chambers of a nautiloid shell
4. Botany a line marking the point of dehiscence in a seed pod or capsule

Suture

 

the surgical uniting, chiefly by a surgical needle and suture material, of tissues cut during surgery or separated by an injury. Threads made of silk, linen, or Dacron and other polymeric materials are used in superficial sutures. In buried sutures, which are applied to internal organs and tissues, absorbable materials, such as catgut or biologically inert polymeric threads, are used; buried sutures are not removed.

One type of superficial suture, cosmetic suture, which is applied to the face, is made using threads of horsehair or thin ca-pron. Osteorrhaphy (osteosynthesis) is a type of buried suture. Primary, primo-secondary, and secondary sutures are distinguished on the basis of when the sutures are applied, which depends on the type of wound. The sutureless union of tissues is achieved with various adhesives made from polymeric materials (for example, cyanoacrylate) or with metal clamps.

suture

[′sü·chər]
(biology)
A distinguishable line of union between two closely united parts.
(medicine)
A fine thread used to close a wound or surgical incision.
References in periodicals archive ?
In its classic form, patients experience a premature closure of the cranial sutures, which leads to brachycephaly, proptosis, a small maxilla, and anomalies of the external and middle ear.
This shift is already evident in Massa's Introductory Book of Anatomy (1536) where he discussed cranial sutures on the basis of "the heads of dead people in cemeteries.
bottae in a restricted area for many years and have correlated the closure of cranial sutures, including the basisphenoid, with known-aged individuals (Smith and Patton, 1980; Daly and Patton, 1986; Patton and Brylski, 1987).
Minor anatomical features that mainly evolved randomly, such as tiny bones on the skull formed by cranial sutures, provide a better comparison for groups living in different parts of the world, he asserts.