crank


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crank,

mechanical linkage consisting of a bar attached to a pivot at one of its ends in such a way that it is capable of rotating through a complete circle about the pivot. One of the principal uses of a crank is to turn reciprocating, or back and forth, motion into rotary motion or vice versa. A bell crank is one designed to change the direction of a linear motion.

Crank

 

the simplest rotating part of a crank mechanism. It has a cylindrical projection, the pin, whose axis is displaced relative to the axis of rotation of the crank by a distance r, which may be fixed or variable (see Figure 1).

Figure 1. Types of crank: (a) with constant radius r of pin displacement, (b) with r regulated by a slide, (c) with r regulated by a rotating disk

crank

[kraŋk]
(mechanical engineering)
A link in a mechanical linkage or mechanism that can turn about a center of rotation.

Crank

In a mechanical linkage or mechanism, a link that can turn about a center of rotation. The crank's center of rotation is in the pivot, usually the axis of a crankshaft, that connects the crank to an adjacent link. A crank is arranged for complete rotation (360°) about its center; however, it may only oscillate or have intermittent motion. A bell crank is frequently used to change direction of motion in a linkage (see illustration). See Linkage (mechanism)

Cranks ( a ) for changing radius of rotation, and ( b ) for changing direction of translationenlarge picture
Cranks (a) for changing radius of rotation, and (b) for changing direction of translation

crank

crank
In a mechanical linkage or mechanism, a link that can turn about a center of rotation. The crank's center of rotation is in the pivot, usually the axis of the crankshaft, that connects the crank to the adjacent link. A crank is arranged for complete rotation (i.e., through 360°) about its center; however, it may only oscillate or have intermittent motion. A bell crank is frequently used to change the direction of the motion in a linkage.

crank

1
1. a device for communicating motion or for converting reciprocating motion into rotary motion or vice versa. It consists of an arm projecting from a shaft, often with a second member attached to it parallel to the shaft
2. a handle incorporating a crank, used to start an engine or motor

crank

2, cranky
(of a sailing vessel) easily keeled over by the wind; tender

crank

(Automotive slang) Verb used to describe the performance of a machine, especially sustained performance. "This box cranks (or, cranks at) about 6 megaflops, with a burst mode of twice that on vectorised operations."
References in periodicals archive ?
Crank says thats the type of fire he had, and was surprised that officers arrested him both times.
Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) [greater than or equal to] 18 and/or inability to maintain a crank rate above 40 to 45 rev min-1 resulted in test termination.
Crank Software is a provider of embedded user interface (UI) solutions, reducing the time, costs, and headaches that notoriously come hand-in-hand with UI development by letting designers and engineers work side-by-side.
Top dead center of the crank cycle is defined as when the crank arm is vertical.
Deep summertime cranking is restricted to environments where the depths big smallmouths occupy coincide with depths where deep-diving cranks can reach or almost reach bottom.
In his new role Crank will report to the company's president and CEO Kevin Cook.
The crank-connecting rod system has two inherent inverse singularities: when the crank and the rod are aligned and when they are superimposed.
IN MARK Neveldine and Brian Taylor's 2006 action-thriller Crank, Jason Statham, pictured, played a hitman who combatted a deadly toxin, injected into him, by maximising the amount of adrenaline in his system.
It only needs some crank to cause the said name badge wearers to receive crank calls at work, or be followed home to find the crank trying to enter your home on a pretence of whatever.
An opaque crank, one that does not allow light to pass through, tends to be more visible in more conditions than a translucent crank.
He added the sequel to 2006's Crank was "more offensive, more ridiculous, more action, more everything".