crank

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crank,

mechanical linkage consisting of a bar attached to a pivot at one of its ends in such a way that it is capable of rotating through a complete circle about the pivot. One of the principal uses of a crank is to turn reciprocating, or back and forth, motion into rotary motion or vice versa. A bell crank is one designed to change the direction of a linear motion.

Crank

 

the simplest rotating part of a crank mechanism. It has a cylindrical projection, the pin, whose axis is displaced relative to the axis of rotation of the crank by a distance r, which may be fixed or variable (see Figure 1).

Figure 1. Types of crank: (a) with constant radius r of pin displacement, (b) with r regulated by a slide, (c) with r regulated by a rotating disk

crank

[kraŋk]
(mechanical engineering)
A link in a mechanical linkage or mechanism that can turn about a center of rotation.

Crank

In a mechanical linkage or mechanism, a link that can turn about a center of rotation. The crank's center of rotation is in the pivot, usually the axis of a crankshaft, that connects the crank to an adjacent link. A crank is arranged for complete rotation (360°) about its center; however, it may only oscillate or have intermittent motion. A bell crank is frequently used to change direction of motion in a linkage (see illustration). See Linkage (mechanism)

Cranks ( a ) for changing radius of rotation, and ( b ) for changing direction of translationenlarge picture
Cranks (a) for changing radius of rotation, and (b) for changing direction of translation

crank

crank
In a mechanical linkage or mechanism, a link that can turn about a center of rotation. The crank's center of rotation is in the pivot, usually the axis of the crankshaft, that connects the crank to the adjacent link. A crank is arranged for complete rotation (i.e., through 360°) about its center; however, it may only oscillate or have intermittent motion. A bell crank is frequently used to change the direction of the motion in a linkage.

crank

1
1. a device for communicating motion or for converting reciprocating motion into rotary motion or vice versa. It consists of an arm projecting from a shaft, often with a second member attached to it parallel to the shaft
2. a handle incorporating a crank, used to start an engine or motor

crank

2, cranky
(of a sailing vessel) easily keeled over by the wind; tender

crank

(Automotive slang) Verb used to describe the performance of a machine, especially sustained performance. "This box cranks (or, cranks at) about 6 megaflops, with a burst mode of twice that on vectorised operations."
References in periodicals archive ?
I get into my car and crank the engine, but to my shock, it doesn't start.
He added: "That they did so at such cost to themselves and their families is an inspiration to many and so it was particularly disappointing to hear the apparently glib dismissal of them as cranks.
TOM: What you want to do is test that crank position.
Joining Cranks and Pranks are a new nail bar Square Ten Nail Salon and photography gallery Black Light Gallery.
They repeated the test according to SC (parallel cranks) and AC (cranks in alternate position, 180[degrees] to each other) crank modes and two types of propulsion, AP and ATP, for four body positions on the HC with different backrest and seating adjustments (backrest angle of 45[degrees] [B45], backrest angle of 85[degrees] [B85], without backrest [WB], and kneeling position [K]) (Figure 2) [27].
The Grocery Company has appointed Ben Johnson brand director to boost the growth of brands such as Nandos and vegetarian range Cranks in grocery channels.
Says Michael Bonallack, secretary of the R and A: "We know in the past Tiger has had crank letters.
But brand director Ben Johnson said the Cranks brand needed to be reinvented to extend its appeal to a wider audience--particular meat-reducers.
com's Crank Gallery offers a variety of customizable content ranging from pop culture expressions to fill-in-the-blank thought bubbles.
Shimano has received more than 630 reports of cranks breaking in North America resulting in 22 injuries, including cuts and fractures.
This configuration allows the angle between the cranks to vary, resulting in the manufacturers' claim that the Rotor system eliminates the dead points where torque production is minimal.
IF CRANKS COULD BE TROLLED UNDER THE ICE, THEY WOULD EXCEL THERE, TOO.