crash

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crash

1
1. a sudden descent of an aircraft as a result of which it hits land or water
2. the sudden collapse of a business, stock exchange, etc., esp one causing further financial failure

crash

2
a coarse cotton or linen cloth used for towelling, curtains, etc.

crash

[krash]
(computer science)
A breakdown, hardware failure, or software problem that renders a computer system inoperative.
(textiles)
A coarse, rugged fabric woven from linen, cotton, or a combination of both.

crash

(1)
A sudden, usually drastic failure. Most often said of the system, especially of magnetic disk drives (the term originally described what happened when the air gap of a hard disk collapses). "Three lusers lost their files in last night's disk crash." A disk crash that involves the read/write heads dropping onto the surface of the disks and scraping off the oxide may also be referred to as a "head crash", whereas the term "system crash" usually, though not always, implies that the operating system or other software was at fault.

crash

(2)
To fail suddenly. "Has the system just crashed?" "Something crashed the OS!" See down. Also used transitively to indicate the cause of the crash (usually a person or a program, or both). "Those idiots playing SPACEWAR crashed the system."

crash

(1) An abnormal termination of a software program. See abend and crash in Windows.

(2) A hard disk failure. See head crash.
References in periodicals archive ?
The WHO/World Bank report points out that while most of the people who die as the result of traffic crashes in the developed world are passengers in vehicles, traffic crashes in poorer countries are more likely to involve pedestrians and motorcyclists.
The NTSB compiles statistics on airplane crashes in each of America's 50 states and divides the country into five regions--northeastern, southeastern, midwestern, southwestern, and western.
Thus, crashes lead to property damage, injury and possibly death, but near-crashes do not, even though they have similar properties.
But some critics don't think the move will solve the biggest problem of push-pull systems - that the light cab car is easily derailed in crashes.
In the last few years] we have had some near-duplicates of fatal crashes from the past.
In the book there's a great, cold sensuality about the crashes, the detail of the vinyl and the blood and the smashed glass and instruments.
Instead of lamenting how readily the tips of their scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs) crash into and damage underlying samples, a group of researchers has figured out how to exploit those crashes to build precise, atom-scale structures, including fences made of straight lines of silver atoms.
Last year, the Palmdale sheriff's station reported eight fatal crashes resulting in nine deaths, while 10 people died in 10 fatal crashes in the area covered by the Lancaster station.
In Texas, according to the AAA Foundation analysis, 2,766 lives were lost in crashes involving young novice drivers from 1995-2004; this included 953 drivers 15-17 years old (34.
The funding and policy changes contained in the federal highway bill under consideration by Congress could jump-start efforts to reduce crashes at urban signalized intersections across the country.
Fortunately she survived - unlike the fate of 1,557 killed nationwide in hit and run crashes in 2003, according to a new analysis by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.
The unmarked detective vehicles were not involved in the crashes.