crease

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crease

1. Cricket any three lines near each wicket marking positions for the bowler or batsman
2. Ice hockey the small rectangular area in front of each goal cage
3. Lacrosse the circular area surrounding the goal
References in periodicals archive ?
Creaser was born in Riverport, Nova Scotia, Canada, November 12, 1922, a son of John and Florence (Patterson) Creaser.
Sandra Fathi, president and founder of Affect, and Katie Creaser, vice president of Affect, will round out the team of qualified judges.
We work in a variety of metals, including steel, galvanized stainless and aluminum, for example," says Creaser.
Westlake C, Dracup K, Creaser J, Livingston N, Heywood JT, Huiskes BL, Fonarow G, Hamilton M (2002) Correlates of health-related quality of life in patients with heart failure.
JEGI), a leading independent investment bank for the media, has appointed Thomas Creaser to the newly created position of executive vice president, Professional Services Group.
The RNIB estimates that approximately 4 percent of books published in the United Kingdom (UK) are rendered in alternative formats (primarily audio) while so little nonbook material is thus rendered that it corrects to zero percent (Lockyer, Creaser, & Davies, 2005).
With his exploration of Anne's dilemma, the conflation of her aural, oral, and sexual openness, Heywood does not simply dramatize conduct-book morality as some critics suggest (Bromley 262; Creaser 285-86), but also explores the inherent contradictions of their tenets.
John Creaser says the ending of Volpone is not really classical--"The harsh outcome .
Claire Creaser, of the Library and Information Statistics Unit, who released the figures, said the fall was due to a number of factors.
Bringing together aesthetic and political concerns in "Prosody and Liberty in Milton and Marvell," John Creaser does a fine job of showing how Milton's individualistic pursuit of liberty is expressed in his flexible use of verse forms.
John Creaser, in a recent article, sees in Milton "a prosody that rejects constraint" in order to express in sublime form Milton's own radical politics (2).
Specifically, research has shown that the strength of the alliance after the third session relates positively to outcome (Hartley & Strupp, 1983; Horvath & Greenberg, 1986; Morgan, Luborsky, Crits-Christoph, Curtis, & Solomon, 1982; Saltzman, Luetgert, Roth, Creaser, & Howard, 1976).