creosote

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creosote

(krē`əsōt), volatile, heavy, oily liquid obtained by the distillation of coal tar or wood tar. Creosote derived from beechwood tar has been used medicinally as an antiseptic and in the treatment of chronic bronchitis. Creosote obtained from coal tar is poisonous. It is used chiefly as a preservative for wood, e.g., in fence posts, railroad ties, and telephone poles, in which it provides protection against fungi, shipworms, and termites, and is also used as a pesticide and to treat psoriasis. Creosote is considered to be highly toxic and a likely carcinogen. It can leach out into the surrounding soil and groundwater, and the fumes exuded will kill young plants in close proximity.

Creosote

A distillate of coal tar, used as a wood preservative.

creosote

[′krē·ə‚sōt]
(materials)
A colorless or yellowish oily liquid containing a mixture of phenolic compounds obtained by distillation of tar; commercial creosote is distilled from coal tar, and pharmaceutical creosote is distilled from wood tar.

creosote

An oily liquid obtained by distilling coal tar; used to impregnate wood (as a preservative) and to waterproof materials. Also called dead oil and pitch oil.

creosote

1. a colourless or pale yellow liquid mixture with a burning taste and penetrating odour distilled from wood tar, esp from beechwood, contains creosol and other phenols, and is used as an antiseptic
2. a thick dark liquid mixture prepared from coal tar, containing phenols: used as a preservative for wood
References in periodicals archive ?
He 'also reported that the ties and timbers were heavily coated with creosote and that creosote commonly coated his work clothes at the end of his work shifts.
Skin disease associated with creosote exposure was specifically reported as early as 1898, when MacKenzie published (in the British Journal of Dermatology) a case involving scrotal papillomatosis in a creosote worker (Mackenzie 1898).
Animal studies have supported an exposure-disease link between creosote and skin cancers.
The term "creosote" is often used to describe these PAH-rich products of combustion and their distillates, and encompasses such products as wood creosote (from the combustion of beech and other woods), coal tar creosote (from the combustion of coal or coal tar), and coal tar pitch volatiles.
Moreover, the remaining creosote content in the poles can still have the preserving capability against decay.
Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the extent of decay resistance of out-of-service utility poles and its relation to residual creosote content and internal distribution.
The investigation was divided into two pans: 1) distribution of residual creosote content in weathered poles; and 2) decay resistance of the corresponding poles.
During sawing, sawdust samples obtained from various vertical and horizontal locations in the poles were collected for creosote cont ent determination, while the lumber portions were used for the decay test.
Creosotes have worldwide use as wood preservatives.
A field trial was installed to compare the in-ground performance of three retentions of each of two oilborne preservative formulations: 1) conventional high-temperature creosote (HTC); and 2) a modified creosote formulation, pigment-emulsified creosote (PEC).
In Europe, for example, specifications for creosote limit the benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) content on the basis that this compound is toxic to humans.
Pigment-emulsified creosote (PEC) was developed using HTC, emulsifiers, stabilizers, and highly refined pigment [14].