crape myrtle

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crape myrtle:

see loosestrifeloosestrife,
common name for the Lythraceae, a widely distributed family of plants most abundant as woody shrubs in the American tropics but including also herbaceous species (chiefly of temperate zones) and some trees.
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The bride's cake table was in front of a natural garden of crepe myrtle trees, pink hydrangeas, and other natural greenery and created a dramatic back drop.
MARTA (the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority) combined forces with Trees Atlanta and its volunteers to plant 2,000 crepe myrtles, 3,500 pine seedlings, and 500 dogwood and oak seedlings along its formerly barren rail lines.
It needed more trees," says Mike Clay of Georgia Power's Land Department, "so we got a landscape plan from the city, bought 80 crepe myrtles, dogwoods, maples, Japanese cedars, and water oaks, and planted them with more company volunteers than we had trees
The city provided 1,100 crepe myrtle, sawtooth oak, and loblolly pine seedlings and 16 more mature trees that were planted by Georgia Forestry Commission foresters, 40 probationers, and other volunteers.
Those very same crepe myrtles that had been pruned into trunk-pillars last winter were heavy with purple flowers.
Accent plants typically take the form of small trees such as purple-leaf plums, saucer magnolias, crepe myrtles or Japanese maples.
Because of the infrequency of street tree maintenance, however, these crepe myrtles are often allowed to sucker to the point where they become almost spherical shrubs instead of trees.
Then again, what is the point of defining crepe myrtles as street trees since, when planted in that capacity, they never reach the stature of trees?
Only two plants would dare to compete with the oleander for summer flowering honors: the crepe myrtle and the bougainvillea.
For example, planting lots of trees - tall shade trees, not wimpy crepe myrtles - is not going to cause any economic harm.
At the Woodley Park garden, annual life cycle changes in fruit trees, Japanese maples, ginkgos, and crepe myrtles document the transition from one season to the next.