crevasse

(redirected from crevasses)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

crevasse

(krəvăs`), large crack in the upper surface of a glacierglacier,
moving mass of ice that survives year to year, formed by the compacting of snow into névé and then into granular ice and set in motion outward and downward by the force of gravity and the stress of its accumulated mass.
..... Click the link for more information.
, formed by tension acting upon the brittle ice. Transverse crevasses occur where the grade of the glacier bed becomes suddenly steeper; longitudinal crevasses, where the glacier spreads over a wider valley or plain. Marginal crevasses are due to the strain built up when the central part moves faster than the sides.

crevasse

[krə′vas]
(geology)
An open, nearly vertical fissure in a glacier or other mass of land ice or the earth, especially after earthquakes.

crevasse

1. a deep crack or fissure, esp in the ice of a glacier
2. US a break in a river embankment
References in periodicals archive ?
Rangers say the crevasses are not marked and visitors need to be careful.
Some crevasses are 20 feet across and hundreds of feet deep.
They will have the opportunity to ski in virgin snow, try some technical ice and rock climbing, and will learn the basics of crevasse rescue.
Lawyer Brian Simpson is thought to have crashed into a crevasse after launching off Mont Blanc on a delta-wing glider on Sunday, July 2.
Using basic principles of marine biology and physics, she explains how moving water transports organisms and their reproductive cells among the rocky crevasses and other niches in the partially submerged shoreline.
These markets are filthy, with flies hovering over the foods and cockroaches hiding in the crevasses awaiting nighttime.
EVEREST conqueror George Band believes the bodies of dead climbers should be dropped down mountain crevasses instead of being brought back for burial.
Small mammals such as bush rats and marsupial carnivores survived the fires by hiding under boulders and in damp rock crevasses.
On good days they could travel no more than 15 miles, and they had to be ever vigilant of the deep crevasses opening up beneath their feet when the snow melted.
Trash left in crevasses above Everest's base camp, for instance, is eventually deposited whole at the foot of the Khumbu ice fall.
The main dangers for a snowboarder are crevasses and avalanches, although Lynn had prepared well for the trip.