crew

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crew

Nautical a group of people assigned to a particular job or type of work

Crew

 

a group of soldiers directly involved in operating a field gun, mortar, machine gun, radio set, or certain other types of combat equipment.

The crew is headed by a gun (mortar or machine gun) commander. The soldiers making up the crew are called by number, and each one performs definite duties. Usually number one is the gunner, number two is the loader, and number three is the carrier. The number of crew members depends on the weapon system.

crew

The personnel who maintain and operate aircraft. The different types of crew are aircrew, ground crew (aircraft servicing personnel), and cabin crew.
References in classic literature ?
The crew then hoisted the yard with the same rapidity and clatter as when they lowered it, all the while keeping silence as though they had neither voice nor breath.
From my vantage point in the window I could see the bodies of her crew strewn about, although I could not make out what manner of creatures they might be.
But when they heard, "And naow to thee, O Capting," booming out of the fog, the crew of the "We're Here" took heart.
Words passed between Clayton and the captain, the former making it plain that he was disgusted with the brutality displayed toward the crew, nor would he countenance anything further of the kind while he and Lady Greystoke remained passengers.
From the engine room companionway came the engineer and stockers, and together we leaped after the balance of the crew and into the hand-to-hand fight that was covering the wet deck with red blood.
Gabriel called off the terror-stricken crew from the further hunting of the whale.
He owned, when driven into a corner, that he seemed to have been wrong about the crew, that some of them were as brisk as he wanted to see and all had behaved fairly well.
Later in the day I got together the whole crew, and told them, as they evidently thought there was some one in the ship, we would search from stem to stern.
The entire ship's crew were undergoing a nervous excitement, of which I can give no idea: they could not eat, they could not sleep--twenty times a day, a misconception or an optical illusion of some sailor seated on the taffrail, would cause dreadful perspirations, and these emotions, twenty times repeated, kept us in a state of excitement so violent that a reaction was unavoidable.
He thought awhile, and then asked his crew if it was not time to slacken speed.
Edmond thus had the advantage of knowing what the owner was, without the owner knowing who he was; and however the old sailor and his crew tried to "pump" him, they extracted nothing more from him; he gave accurate descriptions of Naples and Malta, which he knew as well as Marseilles, and held stoutly to his first story.
Give me, then, a ship and a crew of twenty men to take me hither and thither, and I will go to Sparta and to Pylos in quest of my father who has so long been missing.