Cricetidae

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Cricetidae

[krə′sed·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
A family of the order Rodentia including hamsters, voles, and some mice.

Cricetidae

 

a family of mammals of the order Rodentia. The body length is 5–36 cm, and the tail length is 0.7–33 cm. There are five subfamilies: Cricetinae, Microtinae, Gerbillinae, Neso-myinae, and Lophiomyinae. More than 600 species make up the family’s approximately 100 genera. The rodents are distributed in North and South America, Europe, and Asia, as well as on the island of Madagascar. Seventy-five species, belonging to the subfamilies Cricetinae, Microtinae, and Gerbillinae, are found throughout the USSR. The rodents include terrestrial, subterranean, arboreal, and semiaquatic forms. They are herbivorous or omnivorous. Some species damage agriculture and are carriers of infectious diseases. The pelts of a number of species are used as relatively inexpensive furs.

References in periodicals archive ?
The white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) occurs frequently, and is the only cricetid found in the wooded areas at the site.
Alternatively, a cricetid rodent other than the Mexican deer mouse is the principal host of Ocozocoautla de Espinosa virus (OCEV).
As such, arenaviruses phylogenetically closely related to OCEV, in association with cricetid rodents, may be widely distributed in North America.
For example, Mexican deer mice and other cricetid rodents are consumed by the Tzeltal Indians in the highlands of Chiapas (28).
The new Texas specimens, which include rodent teeth, insectivore or chiropteran tooth fragments and fish teeth, are the first record of cricetid (Copemys) and heteromyid rodents from the Cold Spring Local Fauna.
When treated with dilute acetic acid and screened, approximately 10 kg of this Coldspring conglomerate has yielded seven teeth of the cricetid rodent Copemys, a single tooth of a heteromyid rodent, and insectivore or chiropteran tooth fragments, along with fish teeth and fragments of larger vertebrate teeth and bones.
All sites are Barstovian and the three most abundant categories of small mammals are the geomyoid, cricetid and heteromyid rodents.
The catfish spines, for example, are smaller than most material used for comparison, and it is difficult to conjecture a single ecological cause for small cricetid rodents and small catfish.