crinoline


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

crinoline

a stiff fabric, originally of horsehair and linen used in lining garments

Crinoline

 

an underskirt made of horsehair fabric, worn under a dress to give it a puffed, bell-shaped look. Crinolines originated among the wealthy in France in the 1840’s and quickly spread to other Western and Eastern European countries. In the mid-19th century, a wide skirt made of stiff fabric with sewn-in steel or whalebone hoops (width at the hem reached 6–8 m) was also called a crinoline. Crinolines went out of fashion by the 1870’s.

crinoline

[′krin·əl·ən]
(textiles)
A stiff fabric with an open weave that is filled with hard-twist cotton warp and horsehair.
A fabric with a firm starched or permanent resin finish.
References in periodicals archive ?
The play takes place during a transitional period where dressmakers are starting to maneuver the full crinoline into a bustle.
You need to wear breeches or a crinoline to understand how clothes influenced how you moved, sat down and behaved.
During the second part of the evening, things improved dramatically, with a haunting violin solo played, or so we were informed "on a Stradivarius" by the excellent Julian Trafford, while the most lavish crinolines I have seen for years gave the Strauss melodies a wonderful impact.
Paul McGann Richard Bacon Tim Wonnacott Elissa Corrigan in the drawing room at Sudley House, in Mossley Hill, modelling a crinoline dress made in Liverpool from synthetic hair, which weighed 15 stone
It may have only been a fraction of the four overflowing storage rooms, but the range of 1,500 period outfits, which included chain-mail, corsets, crinolines and frock coats, halved within an hour and a half of opening.
There are two clues, the most outstanding being the lady in the "bulging" skirt (on the left); a crinoline cage was used for the bustle for that purpose.
Its effectiveness in changing the natural shape of a woman's figure is evident in Victorian attire, dominated by first the crinoline and then the bustle.
Firms in Smethwick manufactured bells for churches across the globe, bronze guns for the King of Siam, wire for crinoline dresses, glass for lighthouses and stylish pens for the Waldorf Hotel in New York.
on a crinoline of steam before the trains charged past.
BETSEY JOHNSON's shoulderless crinoline cocktail dress with fitted bodice, dropped waist and full skirt of multiple layers is with silver belt and floral bracelets.
Another day, another bloody awards ceremony, and I take my seat in the bar to await my fellow penguins and the crinoline crew.