crinoline


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crinoline

a stiff fabric, originally of horsehair and linen used in lining garments

Crinoline

 

an underskirt made of horsehair fabric, worn under a dress to give it a puffed, bell-shaped look. Crinolines originated among the wealthy in France in the 1840’s and quickly spread to other Western and Eastern European countries. In the mid-19th century, a wide skirt made of stiff fabric with sewn-in steel or whalebone hoops (width at the hem reached 6–8 m) was also called a crinoline. Crinolines went out of fashion by the 1870’s.

crinoline

[′krin·əl·ən]
(textiles)
A stiff fabric with an open weave that is filled with hard-twist cotton warp and horsehair.
A fabric with a firm starched or permanent resin finish.
References in periodicals archive ?
to breeches crinoline The second tier is reconstruction so that volunteers can easily wear and wash the costumes.
Hoop-skirts, in which increasingly wide hoops were sewn into the crinoline at intervals, causing the skirt to bell out, were ubiquitous in Thoreau's time.
It may have only been a fraction of the four overflowing storage rooms, but the range of 1,500 period outfits, which included chain-mail, corsets, crinolines and frock coats, halved within an hour and a half of opening.
The way that the corset's reappearance exemplifies the repetition and recreation of certain motifs in a consistent history of using fashion to create sexual allure is reiterated in the impressive array of dresses on display, such as a recently acquired 19th-century crimson crinoline whose 18-inch waist is one of the smallest in the FIT collection.
turned out products ranging from beds, including one for the Prince of Wales, to wire for crinoline dresses.
The shape of the costume was maintained by a muslin crinoline.
After his wife Josephine endured several cuts and burns due to kitchen accidents in the early days of their marriage, Earle prepared a ready-made adhesive bandage by laying several cotton squares at intervals along an adhesive strip and covering them with crinoline.
It may have a train, a bustle or a crinoline frame.
Sometimes she uses domestic images to address a theme with global resonance, in "The Crinoline Tree," Elfyn sees in the survival of a tree that "the men brought .
AS singer Andy Bell stripped song by song from a black crinoline dress to leather pants, the packed crowd could have done with cooling off, too.
The old Sunnyside has been bulldozed over long ago, but to this day the smell of hamburger frying with onions will bring me back to those early Canadian experiences: the Exhibition on humid Toronto days and first kisses with girls in crinoline skirts, saddle shoes, and ponytails.