crisis


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Related to crisis: crisis intervention, Crisis management

crisis

Pathol a sudden change, for better or worse, in the course of a disease

Crisis

 

a sharp turning point in the course of a disease that is accompanied by a drop in elevated body temperature and improvement in the patient’s condition.

A crisis usually occurs in acute-onset diseases with a rapid rise in temperature (croupous inflammation of the lungs, malaria, relapsing fever, and so forth). A crisis is associated with profuse sweating, marked weakness, and sometimes a temporary slowing of cardiac activity. A crisis is the opposite of a gradual subsidence of a pathological process and lowering in temperature called lysis. A crisis is to be distinguished from a pseudocrisis, in which there is only a temporary lowering of temperature and improvement in the patient’s condition. A critical drop in temperature may also occur as a result of removal of the suppurative focus from the patient’s body or administration of powerful antimicrobial agents.

crisis

[′krī·səs]
(medicine)
The turning point in the course of a disease.
(psychology)
The psychological events associated with a specific stage of life, as an identity crisis or developmental crisis.
References in periodicals archive ?
On occasion, this is adequate, but more often, crisis procrastination exacerbates the problem and may lead to repeats in the future.
The most common mistake leaders make is to have no plan or template to follow before, during or even after a crisis occurs.
Before Crisis Solutions, Dennis was an officer in the British Army.
In Chapter 2, "Outline for an Ongoing Approach to Crisis Management," different models for the crisis management process are discussed in brief detail.
Our approach to crisis management is what we call "real" crisis management.
Current article makes overview of different views upon crisis management and of given sets of advices what to do, if organisation is in critical situation.
While leading with this "softer" side of crisis communication may not always be feasible, the book reminds readers that crisis planning must go beyond developing basic operational contingencies and initial employee safety plans.
It does an excellent job of explaining the basic issues in the Farm Crisis.
Above I suggest that this crisis is "evident" and "visible.
In addition to consequence management, DOD provides crisis response capabilities.
Weigel maintains that one of the most obvious symptoms of Europe's spiritual crisis is its demographic crisis.
As Mitroff defines it, crisis management is more than the sum of its parts, which include risk management, business continuity planning and crisis communications.