critical

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critical

1. Informal so seriously injured or ill as to be in danger of dying
2. Physics of, denoting, or concerned with a state in which the properties of a system undergo an abrupt change
3. go critical (of a nuclear power station or reactor) to reach a state in which a nuclear-fission chain reaction becomes self-sustaining

critical

[′krid·ə·kəl]
(nucleonics)
Capable of sustaining a chain reaction at a constant level.

critical

Essential for continued operations. In risk analysis, one classifies data by the degree of sensitivity and criticality. See sensitive and risk assessment.
References in periodicals archive ?
The issue of distortion or bias in social cognition is difficult to address with the present data, as the ratings of attentiveness, criticalness, and admiration are inherently subjective.
High criticalness is a component of the concept of expressed emotion (EE), a robust research construct in family psychiatry.
It is believed that the inconsistency in the weld factor with the thinner films is due to the criticalness in horn/fixture alignment [23].
Unless you have critically reviewed the degree of evaluation: (1) the scope and completeness of questions; (2) the degree of physical aptitude that is required, where applicable, to pass; and (3) the frequency and the associated complexity and criticalness of the associated task, one cannot be confident sending out an OQed worker to perform that particular task.
Within this consideration of Uchimura's context, we find the threads that form the crux of the book's central theme: that Uchimura transcended the crosscurrents of cultural and national identity resulting from his acceptance of a non-native religion to the level of one who could speak as a representative of his subsequent faith with equal criticalness to the dichotomous sources of his makeup.
In turn, these categories have filtered to public schools and have been reproduced by teacher and student alike in ways that can foreclose on other possible voices that approach criticalness from a much different space and understanding.
The first challenge is that through the process of assimilation into the mainstream society, the otherness and criticalness of the gay rights movement in the early 1990s has been rap idly erased, flattened and replaced by a growing number of normalized, globalized and commodified gay images.
Tiffany represents a school of thought typified in Houston Diehl who sees in Shakespeare a Protestant self-consciousness and criticalness operating upon traditional material.