crofting


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crofting:

see bleachingbleaching,
process of whitening by chemicals or by exposure to sun and air, commonly applied to textiles, paper pulp, wheat flour, petroleum products, oils and fats, straw, hair, feathers, and wood.
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crofting

[′krȯf·tiŋ]
(textiles)
The whitening of linen by soaking it in an alkaline solution, then drying it in the sun.
References in periodicals archive ?
As well as being a wonderful holiday destination, the Scottish Highlands are home to a quarter of a million people, from the vibrant city of Inverness to remote crofting communities and sparsely populated islands.
Southwards, down the coast at the tiny Gearrannan cove, a group of blackhouses in a former crofting village has been imaginatively updated for self-catering holidays.
The archaeology chapters report: an extensive field survey, categorising sites and monuments by type; sample excavations within these types; and excavations within the crofting township of Balnabodach.
Among their topics are historical sites, a crofting township, pottery usage, the kelping industry, collapse and clearance, and emigration to North America.
A remote crofting community in the north west of Scotland yesterday became the hottest place in the country on the warmest October 27 since records began.
Under the 1976 Crofting Reform Act, crofters are entitled to 50 per cent of the development potential of the land.
lRichard Fox will have his first ride in the royal colours when he partners Maroon's stablemate Crofting in the ten-furlong heat at Newcastle tomorrow.
Probably the best and most cohesive chapter deals with emigration from the Highlands, mainly from the Hebrides, the scene of many of the nastiest clearances of the nineteenth century and subsequently the centre of crofting agitation and reform.
We are lucky in that our income is so low it is supplemented by the state-- crofting is subsidized--and we don't have to pay for health care.
The former clan members were reformed into a crofting community -- a population of only partly subsistence farmers who would pay a cash rent for land allotted to them by their landowner.
FROM PAGE 12 NEXT year, it will be the 40th anniversary of James Hunter's book The Making of the Crofting Community.