crook


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crook

Music a piece of tubing added to a brass instrument in order to obtain a lower harmonic series

crook

1. The warp of a board edge from a straight line drawn between the two ends; also called edgebend or spring.
2. A piece of timber so warped; a knee.
References in classic literature ?
And as he dreamed, Fate, cruel and inexorable, crept stealthily upon him through the dark corridor of the squalid building in which he slept--Fate in the form of the American crook, Condon.
It was not a manorial home in the ordinary sense, with fields, and pastures, and a grumbling farmer, out of whom the owner had to squeeze an income for himself and his family by hook or by crook.
It is of no colour known in this life and has a corrugated wooden crook for a handle, with a metallic object let into its prow, or beak, resembling a little model of a fanlight over a street door or one of the oval glasses out of a pair of spectacles, which ornamental object has not that tenacious capacity of sticking to its post that might be desired in an article long associated with the British army.
But it should result in the rescue of Raffles by hook or crook.
He spoke softly and guardedly; and when he was about to make a statement on his sole responsibility or offer a suggestion, he weighed it by drachms and scruples first, with the crook of his little stick placed meditatively to his teeth.
the end of a rope that had been fresh cut; so I took leave to make another jerk, and, by hook or by crook, I got to the rope.
said Baisemeaux, and he poured out a great glass of wine and drank it off at a draught, trembling with joy at the idea of being, by hook or by crook, in the secret of some high archiepiscopal misdemeanor.
I am an outlaw, and get my living by hook and by crook in a manner it boots not now to tell of.
He is worse than a crook," said a quiet voice close behind them.
For instance, when the Baby was got, by hook and by crook, to a certain point of dressing, and you might have rationally supposed that another touch or two would finish him off, and turn him out a tip- top Baby challenging the world, he was unexpectedly extinguished in a flannel cap, and hustled off to bed; where he simmered (so to speak) between two blankets for the best part of an hour.
He often would Hurly-burly Get up early And go By hook or crook To the brook, And bring home Miller's Thumb, Tittlebat Not over fat, Minnows small As the stall Of a glove, Not above The size Of a nice Little baby's Little fingers.
He was holding a bulky parcel in the crook of his arm.